turing test

Discussion in 'Intelligence & Machines' started by EmptyForceOfChi, Jun 11, 2007.

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  1. JuRtLy The JuRtLy Registered Senior Member

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    back

    i feel (not know, haven't studied human biology well enough), that the human feels pain when the muscle is pushed at a certain pressure that your muscle cannot take (and someone once told me that pain is the way the body lets you know its healing).

    I guess though it wouldn't work exactly like a human because the muscle could never grow, or get stronger, if you poked it it would just keep on hurting the same way forever... but then you'd have to program it that a certain amount of pain causes anger....so forth and so on..
     
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  3. JuRtLy The JuRtLy Registered Senior Member

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    i just noticed i didnt really answer your question but i was trying.. just got sidetracked.....

    i don't really know how to answer the feeling of pain... just that it hurts...

    im thinking though...
     
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  5. one_raven God is a Chinese Whisper Valued Senior Member

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    JuRtLy,
    Nerves, not muscles.
     
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  7. JuRtLy The JuRtLy Registered Senior Member

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    sorry

    i think i just read it, pain receptors, special wires running through the body that are placed in certain areas. Once the nerve gets pushed down a jolt runs up to the brain and that would be their pain.
     
  8. Blindman Valued Senior Member

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    Well I can only explain it with language which is unfortunately inadequate for the job. How about to look at love, many poets have spent endless hours describing the pain of love, just another human discomfort.

    I could describe it as a physical process, vibrating chemicals in a massed orchestration of human metaphors.
     
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