Transuranium Elements

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by Captain Kremmen, May 4, 2010.

  1. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    As atomic numbers increase from 92 to 118, the trend for half life is to be shorter.
    Theoretically, could a Transuranium element be made that is fairly stable?
    Could, for example, element 256 have a half-life as long as Uranium?
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2010
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  3. BigFairy Hi Im Big Fairy! Registered Senior Member

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    under the right conditions, then most probabaly yes.

    but you'll find that these conditions do not exist naturally on earth.


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  5. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    This is open to extreme conditions if necessary.
    But the ideal would be something that could remain stable under temperate conditions , and so long lived you could hold it in your hand without risk of excessive radiation.
     
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  7. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    Isotope half lifes. Note that the darker more stable isotope region departs from the line of protons (Z) = neutrons (N), as the element number Z becomes larger

    Note. Might help. But probably not.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2010
  8. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    Ah yes, the Balmy Island of Stability.
    There's a model that models nucleii as being shells of protons and neutrons.
    This model predicts that there are 'magic numbers' of protons, neutrons, or (IIRC) total nucleii.
    These numbers are magic because they're magically stable (I'm not being derisive or dismissive here), and they're stable because they present full or half full shells (and chemistry teaches us nature loves half full or full shells).

    What has long been predicted, as a consequence of this model is that as they push to higher and higher z's with particle accelerators, they will come across a(nother) 'island of stability' that might have isotopes of elements with half lives measured in years rather than microseconds, and there is already some indications that this is happening.
     
  9. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    Ununoctium, is a noble gas. Half life 0.89ms
    Shouldn't that have been stable if the full shell theory is correct?


    Its nearest element Ununseptium, has a half-life of 78 or 14ms, depending on the isotope.
     
  10. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    Not neccessarily. But then again, compare it to some of the other elements around it, which have half lives in the microsecond range, so Milisecond ranges are relatively stable.

    Also, I should point out that 108 isn't a magic number, the next magic number is 126
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2010
  11. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    126.
    What group of the table would that be in?

    At the rate they are going at creating new elements, we could see it within a few years.

    Could the LHC help?
    I realise it is not one of the current aims.

    Bung Tungsten, 74 and Tellurium, 52 at each other. That's my recipe.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2010
  12. Trippy ALEA IACTA EST Staff Member

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    Element 126 is expected to be a g block element. But as I understand it there's some uncertainty here because there's some uncertainty in the calculations.
     
  13. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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  14. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    A university laboratory has claimed to have found element 122 occurring naturally.

    On April 24, 2008, a group led by Amnon Marinov at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem claimed to have found single atoms of unbibium in naturally occurring thorium deposits at an abundance of between 10−11 and 10−12, relative to thorium.[1] The claim of Marinov et al. was criticized by a part of the scientific community, and Marinov says he has submitted the article to the journals Nature and Nature Physics but both turned it down without sending it for peer review.[3].


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unbibium#Claimed_discovery_as_a_naturally_occurring_element
     
  15. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    Bad News.
    Ununoctium has been rejected.

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    The current heaviest element is Ununhexium.
     
  16. sunshaker Registered Member

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    After expanding p/table, i realised every element as opposeing element as shown here
    http://scienceforums.com/index.php?app=core&module=attach&section=attach&attach_id=3741

    One of the things i found i found is that "element 126" is opposed by silver 47, which would then sugguest that gold79 and silver 47 would be the "recipe", and as we know gold in its "native form" is usually found with other metals such as silver,
    Which i believe "once" exsisted as element 126 in earlier stage of "universe expansion".
     
  17. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    Please only post nonscientific beliefs and conjectures in the fringe section.
     
  18. KitemanSA Registered Senior Member

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    The theory he was talking about was NUCLEAR shells, not electron shells. Noble gasses are noble chemically, not nuclearly.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_number_(physics)
     

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