Transforming hydrogen into metal for room temperature superconductor

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by Plazma Inferno!, Aug 19, 2016.

  1. Plazma Inferno! Ding Ding Ding Ding Administrator

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    Several scientific teams are striving to transform hydrogen, ordinarily a gas, into a metal. It’s a high-stakes, high-passion pursuit that sparks dreams of a coveted new material that could unlock enormous technological advances in electronics.
    Metallic hydrogen in its solid form, scientists propose, could be a superconductor: a material that allows electrons to flow through it effortlessly, with no loss of energy. All known superconductors function only at extremely low temperatures, a major drawback. Theorists suspect that superconducting metallic hydrogen might work at room temperature. A room-temperature superconductor is one of the most eagerly sought goals in physics; it would offer enormous energy savings and vast improvements in the transmission and storage of energy.

    https://www.sciencenews.org/article/pressure-make-metallic-hydrogen
     
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  3. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    Was a decision made to turn new stories into threads in an effort to reduce the spam on this site? This, and the many other similar threads, seems more like a news feed rather than a thread. I'm just curious about the thinking behind this administrative decision.
     
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  5. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    There seem to be two enormous "if"s in this piece. First, it is said that metallic hydrogen may be a room-temperature superconductor. But it may not, presumably. No reason for thinking it might be is given. I'd be interested to learn the rationale for this.

    Secondly, and without any citation, it is stated that "some researchers" (who?) think metallic hydrogen, once formed, might be stable! That seems remarkably unlikely, given that a pressure of several million bar is needed to get any where close to forming it.
     
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