Today's computers should be good for 20 years

Discussion in 'Computer Science & Culture' started by Syzygys, Jun 15, 2012.

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  1. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    I am reading about the new MacBook Pro, and I can't stop thinking:

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articl...ate-my-new-macbook-pro-a-geek-s-critique.html

    Since I have laptops 5+ years old still using XP as OS, but getting the job done just fine, unless some huge improvement occurs in the near future, today's laptop shouldn't get obsolete for at least 20 years. The RAM the come with are already 8 times bigger than my little notebook's 1 G, and as I mentioned, that still does the job, what the average user uses a computer.

    Of course, computer manufacturers are going to keep trying to sell us the latest toys, but really, unless you have special needs, that cheap thing what you can buy for $300 today, will (should) last you for a decade at least, assuming it doesn't break down...
     
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  3. Michael 歌舞伎 Valued Senior Member

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    I can't run some software with my older PC because some of them 32 bit and I really need 64 bit. Even just to run Adobe CS5.5 you really need a newer PC. Also, in 20 years I doubt everyone will be lugging around laptops. I have one of the first 64 bit laptops with an AMD processor and it now has Win7 (runs much better compared with Vista). I you may be if laptops can access online mainframes (dummy terminals) then you wouldn't need to upgrade too often. I've been using this laptop for 5+ years.
     
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  5. mathman Valued Senior Member

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    One problem is that Micrsoft keeps developing new operating systems while eventually dropping support for their older systems. Windows XP is close to the point of no longer being supported, while previous versions are long gone.
     
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  7. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

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    Are you forgetting about planned obsolescence? Both hardware and software companies plan for there products to become obsolete between 5 & 10 years. If they can't get you to buy new products in a timely manor they will go out of business. I just know you don't want that to happen. Maybe your XP operating system still works, but you now have to 3rd party support for it, and I have to tell you I hated XP, it was way more trouble than it was worth.
     
  8. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    The real question is by the point that XP support is dropped, does it become abandonware, where any open-source group could potentially pick up the gauntlet should they so choose?
     
  9. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    Be very glad you didn't suffer the wrath of Windows 95, especially if you installed it from floppies only to find a boot parity virus had somehow gotten installed too.

    The worst bit was of course attempting to do CAD on a system back then and having to save every action, just to make sure that you didn't lose everything because it would fall over from all the memory leaks.
     
  10. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    But I bet you, 90% of your PC needs is covered by it. What most people use a PC anyway? Internet, watching movies and communicating. A 10 years old computer did and still does that just fine.

    Computers have improved much faster then the programs' needs. Another analogy would be taking pictures... Who buys a photo camera nowadays? Just a pro.. Almost all cellphones have a camera, or any handheld device, including laptops.

    Just because the support is gone, that doesn't mean you can't run the software. Lots of people use versions without the Service Pack updates...
    What is the end date of Vista's support??? I looked it up and it is only 2017, MS just want you to switch to the newer OS, but it is an arbitrary deadline, it doesn't mean Vista will stop working after that date...
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2012
  11. Syzygys As a mother, I am telling you Valued Senior Member

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    That just proves my point. If they have to plan obsolescence, that means the product is so good that it could be used forever, or for a very long time...
    Sure they want to sell more, but that doesn't mean they have to. Do we need Windows 8? Of course not. A service pack for 7 would do it just fine...

    I didn't see my computer needs changing drastically in the last 10 years. Now the internet is so fast, the movie downloads takes only 5 minutes. If it is 2 seconds in 20 years, it will not be such a huge difference... The difference between 5 minutes to 2 seconds is much less than from 2 hours to 5 minutes.

    I think our oldest desktop is 8 years old and I can use it just fine for everything I have been doing with computers. Most people are like that.

    Do business people need 3D on their laptops or scented shit? My wife's business (big corporation) laptop still has XP on it...

    And I have to tell you, people love it, including me. It is more than a decade old and 1/4 of the world STILL using it:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usage_share_of_operating_systems

    So bottomline stands: Today's average computers are so good, they can be used 20 years from now.

    P.S.: I was trying to use W 7's Homegroup network feature, and I was sweating bullets to make it work. Really, Microsoft???
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2012
  12. Buddha12 Valued Senior Member

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    I've used Win XP for many years without many problems and if I ever have any really bad problem with it I can always to a clean install with the CD I've got sitting on my bookshelf. That way if anyone ever does have to remove and replace their XP they always have a fresh system awaiting them if they have the CD.

    As for the new programs that are developed that can only use the newer Win 7 well then you have a problem but I still use older programs that do almost the same thing using XP and they are just as good as what the new programs seem to offer only not as many bells and whistles.
     
  13. The Marquis Only want the best for Nigel Valued Senior Member

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    Games.

    Q.E.D.
     
  14. Rav ∞ Valued Senior Member

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    Indeed.

    Further, there are a whole lot of other seriously cool things that a computer can do if there is more raw processing power to exploit. And it's pretty much guaranteed that a lot of people are going to want to experience it. For example, do you think you've seen high definition video yet? You haven't. Pixels are going to keep getting smaller, and video is going to keep ramping up to higher resolutions, until looking at your computer screen is almost like looking out your window. But you can't have such things without the hardware to handle it.
     
  15. Yazata Valued Senior Member

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    I've got an old 1990's Toshiba laptop that's about 15 years old. It still works fine for what I use it for -- mostly light internet surfing and my e-books. It's still running Windows 2000, which despite being ancient is perfectly satisfactory for my needs too. The one thing that's failed on it is its battery, which no longer holds a charge, so I have to plug it in to use it.

    It's not my primary computer, but it's one that I still frequently use.
     
  16. keith1 Guest

    I think you all hit on aspects of it.
    --old tech that is not open source, is riddled with expensive patent-infringement battle scars, hacked vulnerabilities, operation downsides, new technology impediments, commercial attempts to harness its function, etc...

    I think all children should (mandatory class time) look at, basic DOS, old DOS 3.1 games, and programming edutainment, not affiliated with the internet. Linux, Mac, and other old school tooth-cutters.
     
  17. Repo Man Valued Senior Member

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    Its days are numbered though. With 2000, you're limited to IE6. Since MS dropped support for 2000 some time ago, more and more programs no longer support it. Firefox was an option for a modern browser, but they recently dropped support for 2000. Watching an HD video on YouTube would be completely out of the question. We have a couple of computers at work running 2000 that I set up years ago. The circle is shrinking, and I know they don't have much longer before they'll have to be scrapped. There's little point in replacing them with computers with XP, as support for that will be dropped in April of 2014.
     
  18. Yazata Valued Senior Member

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    The versions of IE and Firefox that I have on it still work fine. Maybe as years go by, more and more websites will add features that aren't compatible. Or maybe something else will happen. (Time is like that.) But that's not something that I'm worried about. I already have several computers. My point is simply that the 15-year-old machine is still hanging in there, highly functional at this advanced age, and so is its ancient software.

    I'm not all that interested in YouTube. If I want to do something that the old machine can't do, I'll just use a different computer. Nevertheless, the thing still remains very useful today, even if it won't run all the latest and coolest software. I mostly use it for my several thousand e-books, and will probably continue to use it for that purpose indefinitely, as long as it holds out.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2012
  19. keith1 Guest

    A base of operations for hidden spam and virus "tentacle forays" for years to come...
     
  20. aaqucnaona This sentence is a lie Valued Senior Member

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    I dont know what to say! My 2500$ game development/animation workstation* and high end gaming computer, bought recently, is going to be obsolete in just 6-7 years. If all you do is type letters and send emails, sure - but for serious users, its actually tough to stay on top of the developmental curve in computational technology.

    * I am doing a software/tech diploma in CGI after which I will do an art course in animated filmaking or game development.
     
  21. Repo Man Valued Senior Member

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    They run a business version of Trend Micro's anti virus software at my job, and the latest update (a few weeks old now) does not run correctly on the three Win 2000 machines. The latest version of Flash will not work. The latest version of Adobe reader will not work. These machines have hardware that would run Windows XP with no issues, but as that has less than two years worth of updates left, it's hardly worth the trouble.
     
  22. Yazata Valued Senior Member

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    That looks like one of the advantages of the thing. If I have any doubts about something unhealthy hitching a ride on something that I'm downloading (typically e-books), then I can restrict it to an older machine that's basically expendible, share the material with e-readers and backup usb-drives as needed, but leave my better machines out of the equation entirely.

    But it doesn't really matter. I was just telling the board that I have a machine that's about 15 years old that's still quite useful and very functional.

    It's the truth. Whether other people approve of that is of no concern to me.
     
  23. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    Not just Microsoft

    Although it isn't as big of a problem, Apple does this, too. I have a dual G5 tower running 10.5.8, and after several occasions when Apple (ahem) "accidentally" bricked applications by updating to Intel versions, I just want them to fuck off. I mean, I get the bit about not supporting PPC software; at some point it's a losing proposition for them. But given how intuitive OSX is supposed to be, you might think Apple would be the one organization in the world that could discriminate between its different chipsets.

    Apparently not.

    Or else they're intentionally bricking G5s.

    They'll kill this thing if I let them.
     
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