Titanium vs. steel

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by Facial, Mar 17, 2006.

?

Your favorite of the two?

  1. TITANIUM

    35 vote(s)
    71.4%
  2. STEEL

    14 vote(s)
    28.6%
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  1. phlogistician Banned Banned

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    It's also hypoallergenic, which is quite handy. Lots of watch cases and jewellery contain Nickel, and this can cause a rash when it comes into contact with some people's skin. Titanium doesn't, so is a safe bet.
     
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  3. Chatha big brown was screwed up Registered Senior Member

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    I like Titanium too, Steel is sort of old news. Steel is an alloy so its sort of unfair to compare the two.
     
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  5. phlogistician Banned Banned

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    Titanium used in watches and other jewellery is an allow too, so it's a direct comparison of two alloys.
     
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  7. Chatha big brown was screwed up Registered Senior Member

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    You are mistaken. Titanium is an element and iron is an alloy. Steel is composed of usually Iron(90%) and some carbon, which are themselves elements. Titanium is not an alloy. Iron was too combersome and corrosive so they invented Steel, but Titanium is a even better water resistent than Steel. You may need some basic chemistry knowledge to understand this
     
  8. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    Chatha, titanium is an element and iron is an element. Steel is an alloy, but the kind of titanium used in jewelry is probably not pure, and also an alloy with some other metal.

    Stainless steel is a good alloy for watches, and safe for most people, but a watch that my friend had was supposed to be titanium and gave her an allergic reaction, so another friend electroplated it with boron.
     
  9. thedevilsreject Registered Senior Abuser Registered Senior Member

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    chatha perhaps you need to take a look at a periodic table. iron is an element and its symbol is Fe
     
  10. phlogistician Banned Banned

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    Titanium is an element, but the 'Titanium' used in jewellery is in actual fact, an alloy.
     
  11. Facial Valued Senior Member

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    Look it up on Matweb. Steel is stiffer than titanium - always. This has more to do with the properties of the raw metal than the carbon precipitate.
     
  12. MetaKron Registered Senior Member

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    Refrigerators have to be made of or at least covered in a ferromagnetic material. Otherwise the refrigerator magnet industry would go out of business.
     
  13. phlogistician Banned Banned

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  14. Chatha big brown was screwed up Registered Senior Member

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    Sorry, stupid mistake

    The whole purpose of an alloy is to improve a metal for certain uses. Steel, an alloy of Iron is still not as good as titanium in terms of corrosion. Lets not even begin to mention Titanium alloys, which are like 100 times better than Iron in corrosion. I think all those smartass engineers use titanium alloys these days for building, I'm not sure though. Pure Titanium is in between steel and aluminium in terms if weight and stress level. However, some titanium alloys are just as strong as steel. The good thing about Iron is that its more abundant in nature. Titanium has basically the same strength as steel but relatively lighter. Titanium alloys and steel are used accordingly, it all really depends on what you want to use them for.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2006
  15. MetaKron Registered Senior Member

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    Because they can.
     
  16. MetaKron Registered Senior Member

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    Stainless steel is quite a bit cheaper than titanium.
     
  17. Facial Valued Senior Member

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    It seems from the high performance of titanium we would expect certain mechanical tools, or specialty nuts and screws, to be made out of bulk titanium alloy. These, of course, would be more expensive than their steel counterparts, but I suppose if it was really a superior metal then you would see maybe 10%-20% of tools, especially those for high-stress applications, being made of titanium alloys.

    However, this is not the case - steel still dominates the tool industry. I have a set of 10-inch pliers, at least 20 years old, made of vanadium steel, and still in great condition. In fact, the serrations on the grip face are still rough to the touch.

    Also, I have never seen a bent screwdriver in my life. Have you ever tried bending a screwdriver?
     
  18. MetaKron Registered Senior Member

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    If you've never seen a bent screwdriver in your life, you've lived a sheltered life. I've seen many.
     
  19. invert_nexus Ze do caixao Valued Senior Member

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    Yeah. Seriously. You can't be much of a tool user, Facial. Sure, tools can last forever if you use them like a housewife...
     
  20. Facial Valued Senior Member

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    Ooh, that hurts.

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    Can you bend screwdrivers with your hands?
     
  21. invert_nexus Ze do caixao Valued Senior Member

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  22. Facial Valued Senior Member

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    Whoa - what diameter are we talking about?
     
  23. invert_nexus Ze do caixao Valued Senior Member

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    Heh.
    Ok. Small screwdrivers. Mostly.
    However, you get to reefing on a screwdriver with all you got, and maybe even break out a wrench for persuasive purposes, you can tweak a screwdriver. Even a big one.

    However, the biggest problems with screwdriver wear is not bent shafts, but rather stripped heads. And stripped out screwdrivers (and screws for that matter) are a rather common problem, yes?
     
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