Thoughts from South of the Equator .

Discussion in 'Free Thoughts' started by river, Aug 24, 2020.

  1. river

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    What do observers from this part of Earth see in Their Telescopes ?

    As Compared to the Northern Hemisphere .
     
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  3. river

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    Seriously , I Expected hundreds if not , thousands of the Southern Hemisphere Observers of the Night Sky . From their perspective . From Australia , New Zealand , Indonesia , Africa , South America . Speak .
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2020
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  5. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    Seriously??

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    Sure, well all us poor souls south of the equator, are doing our best to keep a foothold as obviously by your thinking gravity does not exist, and being on the bottom, we are having one hell of a job staying on this oblated sphere, hanging like a bat upside down. That's OK river, we do get used to it over time...wait, time doesn't exist either!!

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    well heck you know what I mean.
     
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  7. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    They see constellations that never rise above the local horizon in the northern hemisphere. They have better views of some constellations that northerners can see to some extent, because those constellations rise higher above the horizon for them. On the other hand, the reverse applies for certain other constellations. Southerners tend to have a good view of the South Celestial Pole, but a lousy (or non-existent) view of Polaris.
     
  8. sculptor Valued Senior Member

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  9. foghorn Registered Senior Member

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    I'm reminded here of a question from an exam in my younger days, and which I never saw the official answer to.

    Why is the Southern night sky more lighter than the Northern night sky?

    My guess then was, the Southern night sky contains our Galaxy's central bulge.
    Still don't really know now??? Now, many years later I will add to that guess, I would now mention the Magellanic Clouds as well.
    Overall I passed.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2020
  10. gmilam Valued Senior Member

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    I'd be skeptical of any teacher who used the phrase "more lighter".
     
  11. foghorn Registered Senior Member

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    Well, you may be right, it might have been more brighter. I'm now thinking perhaps it had something to do with number of stars of a certain magnitude in each of the celestial hemispheres? Although the question didn't mention any particular thing.
    Ps. I just put the exam question into google and didn't get anything answering it direct.
    I tried lighter and brighter in turn.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2020
  12. Janus58 Valued Senior Member

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    The central bulge lies in the direction of Sagittarius, which is On the ecliptic and thus spends a good time in the night sky of the Northern hemisphere. Besides that, it is hidden by dust clouds between us and it.
    There is an other possible explanation. The solar system is tipped a ~60 degree angle to the galactic plane, We also tend to be more towards one edge of our spiral arm, With the Southern hemisphere more pointed towards its "heart".
    The spiral arms are caused by pressure waves traveling though the galaxy, which encourage star formation. Thus you should have more new stars in the direction of the Southern hemisphere than in the Northern hemisphere. Not only that, but the brightest stars tend have shorter lifespans. Ergo, the stars that tend to live long enough for the compression wave to completely pass, are the smaller dimmer stars. Given all this, one would expect to see more and, on average, brighter stars from the Southern hemisphere, which faces more towards the middle line of the spiral arm.
     
  13. foghorn Registered Senior Member

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    Thank you Janus. That was interesting. Crumbs, did they expect me to know that.
     
  14. river

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    Interesting .

    Why do pressure waves cause star formation ?
     
  15. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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  16. river

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    Last edited: Oct 7, 2020
  17. Hipparchia Registered Senior Member

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    They fragment and collapse the Giant Molecular Clouds.

    What direction is at right angles to a spiral at any point? Does that clarify it for you?
     
  18. river

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    Why do they fragment .
     
  19. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    It won't betcha...you're dealing with river who dismisses all mainstream cosmology.

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  20. river

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    I asked a question , which you can not answer .
     
  21. Hipparchia Registered Senior Member

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    It's odd that a river would avoid the mainstream. It's self-contradictory.

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  22. Hipparchia Registered Senior Member

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    I answered it. If you don't understand it, we can work on that.
     
  23. river

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    Post#15

    Why do they fragment .
     

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