There are 2 kinds of liquid water

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by timojin, Nov 17, 2016.

  1. timojin Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,051
    danshawen likes this.
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,286
    danshawen likes this.
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. danshawen Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,942
    How many isotopes of oxygen occur naturally? Hydrogen? The temperature was mentioned, but not the pressure. Why not?

    There are many types and states of water / ice. This is one reason why, in another recent thread, the possibility of forms of abiogenesis we understand nothing about should not be discounted or discarded so readily and replaced with Genesis, which was never intended as science or a science textbook. Genesis doesn't even scratch at the surface of what we don't know. It is a joke written for gullible mishappen people too stupid even to get the humor in it.

    If we can miss the science of properties of water, which is vital to survival, what really are the chances we have a handle on understanding anything else in the universe?

    'Hysterical'? Hilarious.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2016
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. Janus58 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,787
    Three for each.
    For Oxygen, O16 accounts for 99.76% , O17 0.04% and O18 0.2%
    For Hydrogen, H1 accounts for 99.98%, H2 0.02% and just a trace of H3, which has a half-life of 12.32 years.
     
    danshawen likes this.
  8. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,604
    They keep using the word 'state'. I do not think that word means what they think it means.

    I do believe they mean 'phases'.

    And there are at least a dozen phases of water:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice#Phases
     
  9. timojin Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,051
    If you say progressive transition , are you not admitting there are two states ? # 1 before transition # 2 after the Hydrogen bonds broken
     

Share This Page