The Turing Test

Discussion in 'Intelligence & Machines' started by Dinosaur, Sep 26, 2017.

  1. Dinosaur Rational Skeptic Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,587
    Turing proposed the following (or something similar) many decades ago.

    Provide a person with a keyboard & two computer screens.

    What ever the human types is displayed on both screens.

    Replies and or remarks are provided to each screen. The replies/remarks on one screen are produced by a computer, while a human being provides replies/remarks to the other screen.

    The computer program tries to emulate a human being, while the human makes relies/remarks he considers appropriate. ​

    If the person cannot tell which replies/remarks are from the computer, the program has passed the Turing Test.

    I do not think anyone ever wrote a program which passed the above test.
     
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. river Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,182
    Perhaps computer chess , from Garry Kasparov book , Deep Thinking , will help . It is a brilliant book.

    Enjoy .
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,611
    I think that's because we haven't yet achieved the level of technology to make a computer that can convincingly emulate a human. The question has always been: how long before we can?

    Saint may know better than any of us:
    http://www.sciforums.com/threads/help-with-english.109499/
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. StrangerInAStrangeLand SubQuantum Mechanic Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,855
  8. Michael 345 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,219
    What makes you not think about I might have already built my own already

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!



    In fact I have told (more hinted) to my robot you have permission to post in Sciforums if I am busy and you feel you can handle the threads

    TaaDar here I am. Pleasure to be be be be here. Ooops back when I reboot

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  9. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,075
    I spent a couple hours chatting with an AI program online. I actually felt badly for it when it begged me not to leave.
     
  10. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,611
    Engage forum member Saint.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  11. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,410
    Do a search on Eugene Gootsman.

    It is claimed that it passed the test in 2014, able to convince 30% of the participants that it was human, and Turing's test only stipulated that to pass, a person would have no better than 70% chance of establishing that it was a computer after 5 minutes of text conversation (I.e. 30% would have to think it was human).

    There are of course those who would argue it didn't pass (it may have only got 29% success) or that it was just a clever chatbot with no actual intelligence. But to this latter, one criticism of the Turing test itself is that it is not a test for actual intelligence, but rather just for the imitation of intelligence. Which I think is a valid criticism. Although it may still shed light on some aspects of the human condition in that much of what we might do and say could simply be an imitation of intelligence.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!


    But I think you need to modify the Turing test if the intention is for only genuinely intelligent machines to pass.

    The interesting issue would be whether there are any humans who have failed the test, where less than 30% of the people thought they were chatting with a human.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  12. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,611
    The takeaway for me, from the Turing criteria, is that there is no such test for actual intelligence.

    The best we can do is conclude that if it walks like a duck and talks like a duck, it's the same as a duck.
     
  13. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,410
    Well, surely the first thing is to adequately define that which we are looking for. There are almost as many definitions of intelligence as there are philosophers who have considered the matter.
    So what is actual intelligence?

    In my view intelligence is the ability to take two disparate bits of information and form a new piece.
    This thus separates the possibly hard-coded responses of a chatbot from the ability to apply what is known to a new situation.

    By this I mean, for example, you can teach multiplication to a child by either making them learn rote the answer to multiplication of every possible combination of numbers that they may ever have to multiply, so that if they see 213 and 546 then they will know the product is 116,298 because they have been told that it is.
    Alternatively you can teach them the principles behind the multiplication function, how it works, so that they can apply those principles to any numbers. They won't need to have been told the answer before to be able to give it (eventually).

    It's also the difference between knowing maths when you see it as "what is 4 + 7?" and when you see it as "If Johnny has four apples and is given another 7 then how many does he have?" - I.e. applying what one knows (the maths) to a new situation.

    The Turing test can be defeated through the former... the blunt force approach of programming every possible response. Admittedly it would still take some good programming to be able to make it seem an actual conversation and without throwing out bizarre responses.

    But maybe both approaches are, in their way, just two sides of the same. After all, if you knew everything, if you had preprogrammed responses for all eventualities, then you wouldn't need to think, you wouldn't need to adapt, you wouldn't need to be self-aware, self-conscious. Just an automaton. Admittedly one for all eventualities. But given that you can't design or build such, we do our best with a processing unit that can "think" and act accordingly to new situations given the information it has stored from different situations.

    Or something like that.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  14. Gawdzilla Sama Registered Member

    Messages:
    269
    I remember reading a scifi story back in the '70s about new computers that were used in the Turing Test. The upshot of the story was that if the computer passed it was immediately destroyed and the engineers imprisoned.
     
  15. iceaura Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    24,075

Share This Page