The Super Blood Wolf Moon of 2019

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by cluelusshusbund, Jan 22, 2019.

  1. cluelusshusbund + Public Dilemma + Valued Senior Member

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    For those who didnt see it here is a pic i took.!!!

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  3. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

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    That's pretty. It was paler by the time it woke me up at 4 am.
     
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  5. nebel

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    claimed by nebel's son pacific north west telescopic lens. persistence paid off, cloudy intervals. the red lantern effect.

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  7. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    A nice example of the effect of Rayleigh Scattering of the sun's light, traversing a long path length through the Earth's atmosphere before reaching the moon.
     
  8. nebel

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    On a more simple level, sitting there watching it, I thought this scene is the reverse of what the moon normally signals us . The shape of the sunny part at the end made a "d" for declining or "a" for "abnehmend", but during that final phase of the eclipse the bright part was increasing.
    exchemist, good reminder. the red glow was earth shine at it's best.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2019
  9. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    It is not Earthshine.

    Earthshine is the illumination of the moon by light reflected from the Earth.

    The red illumination of an eclipsed moon is due to sunlight shining through the edges of the Earth's atmosphere, i.e. it is transmitted, not reflected light. That is why it is red: Rayleigh scattering takes out the blue and some of the green, allowing the red to pass.

    Reflected light will be the other way round, depleted in red and augmented in blue, since scattered light forms a proportion of what is reflected.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2019
  10. nebel

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    1,888
    Thank you, for setting the record straight! very enlightening (pun happening accidentally)
    As usually, my conclusion was arrived at without checking the strict definition. but The red moonshine we saw, was it not caused by sunlight [slightly] redirected by Earth? , through kind of a refraction? loosely the Earth being essential for both? keep it up!
     
  11. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    Had a clear view of the first half hour or so of totality, until forerunning snowstorm haze moved in.

    A small irony: because a total lunar eclipse is high in the sky rather than near the horizon where the moon looks bigger, and because dark things look smaller than light things of the same size at a distance, and because the reduction of the moons light reduced the washout of the stars and the often dramatic shadows cast by moonlight (so all the stars looked much bigger and brighter than they normally do near a full moon, including Orion high and nearby),

    all of this enhanced by the the clarity of cold, dry, January winter air (Orion in season),

    at totality this was probably the smallest and least dramatic, in appearance, of any full moon I have ever seen in my life.
     
  12. cluelusshusbund + Public Dilemma + Valued Senior Member

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  13. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    Should qualify: that sky was a lovely sight, well worth the cold and walk. But a gentle and peaceful one, of beauty rather than spectacle.
     
  14. nebel

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    yeah, sitting in my backyard, I was glad not to haven given up. despite intermittent clouds, Luna "reserved the best for last" at least here. well, the moon- rising too was most spectacular over the water.
    PS: When we look at a full moon, at zenith, more or less, (Even when the Earth does not do a transit as seen from the moon) the moon must be furthest from the sun right? so adding up the two orbital velocities gives an amazing number in km/h. please check it out in :"doing the numbers on No. 1" in pseudo science.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2019
  15. nebel

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    the moon was a sitting target, now other pictures videos captured the hit by a 2 kg meteoroid, new scientist article. it was not sitting the moon traveling at a combined speed of
    ~111 111 km /h.
     
  16. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    It was cold here, but mostly clear, so I went out several times (including totality) for several minutes at a time rather than for an extended period of time.

    The last one that I remember seeing here when it was clear was more spectacular. Lower in the sky and thus it appeared much larger and redder. Still, it's cool for there to be a bright full Moon and then very dark and then bright and full again, all on the same night.
     

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