The Sun Is Not Hot

Discussion in 'Pseudoscience' started by chung, Jun 12, 2013.

  1. billvon Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    14,166
    Changes in magnetic flux in small areas reduce the amount of heat that can convect to the surface - so those areas cool down slightly. ("Sunspots" are still blindingly bright; they are just slightly darker than the rest of the Sun.)
    Because it takes time to reach the surface of the Sun. Keep in mind that the Sun is huge - almost a million miles across. It is so large that it can take photons thousands of years to make it from the center of the sun (where fusion is occurring) to the surface.
     
    river likes this.
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  3. river

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    11,058
    Next question ;

    Does the rotations of the sun vary ?

    Does the north , equator , south have fluctuations in their speed of rotation ?
     
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  5. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    The sun is not a solid object. Different latitudes rotate at different rates.

    Or, to reference Wiki:

    "Solar rotation varies with latitude because the Sun is composed of a gaseous plasma. The rate of surface rotation is observed to be fastest at the equator, and to decrease as latitude increases. The solar rotation period is 24.47 days at the equator and almost 38 days at the poles."


    I am conflicted about providing you with knowledge. Optimistically, the more you learn, the more you will understand how things (such as the sun) work. Pessimistically, you will simply misuse it to make more outlandish and ignorant claims.

    But that's up to you.
     
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  7. river

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    11,058
    Focus , Dave , this is my question ;

    Does the the Suns north , equator , south have fluctuations in their speed of rotation ?

    I
    n otherwords does the lateral speed of the Sun's north , equator and south rotation , change ?
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  8. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    9,214
    Speaking of focus...

    I answered your question - twice.

    ... unless you are asking if a given latitude's rotation changes over time.
     
  9. river

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    You have not answered my question .

    You do not even understand the question I put forward to you .
     
  10. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Then why not rephrase? It should be apparent that there is some ambiguity in the question as written.
     
  11. river

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    11,058

    Sure

    Does the speed of the north hemisphere of the Sun rotation change its speed ?
     
  12. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    That's a good question.

    I haven't found any explicit references, but this excerpt seems to suggest it does:

    "Because the Solar rotation is variable with latitude, depth and time, any such system is necessarily arbitrary and only makes comparison meaningful over moderate periods of time."

    No idea how much.
     
  13. river

    Messages:
    11,058
    Neither do I .

    But what you are referring to is not what I am .

    Just take the north Sun rotation , now ask ; does it fluctuate in its speed or velocity ?
     
  14. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    9,214
    I don't see how that is not addressed by the excerpt.

    "Solar rotation is variable with ... time".

    Since various latitudes of the sun rotate with different speeds, and those speeds are variable with time, that's pretty much saying that the various latitudes (including latitudes in the North) each vary in speed.

    If that's not answering your question, then I guess you'll have to do your own research.
     
  15. river

    Messages:
    11,058
    It doesn't answer my question .

    My own research has already been started .

    Dave say you could ONLY see the Sun's north latitude rotation , visualise this , can you do this ? If not no problem .
     
  16. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    9,214
    OK, well, you're on your own.
     
  17. river

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    11,058
    No surprise .
     
  18. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Yah, cuz it's everybody else's problem to learn you up.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  19. river

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    11,058
    Then learn me up , everybody ....

    Because let me warn the bunch of you , I have communicated with Universities about this topic .
     
  20. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Yeah, cuz that's our problem.

    Seriously, how can you expect everybody else to teach you stuff, and then turn around and try to pretend you know stuff that you can teach others?


    Ha ha. I guess if sending emails to people that are met with silence could be called communication.

    You got nothin'. You always got nothin'.
     
  21. river

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    11,058
    There is nobody here , on this site , that has studied the Sun as a career , for 20-30yrs . Regardless , I would still ask this question I have given to you .

    Dave let me ask you something , what is it that you want from science ?
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
  22. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    21,703
    https://www.sciencealert.com/the-sun-is-slowing-down-and-scientists-think-they-finally-know-why

    The Sun Is Slowing Down, And Scientists Think They Finally Know Why
    Nothing lasts forever.


    FIONA MACDONALD
    15 DEC 2016
    Astronomers think they might have finally solved the mystery of how and why the Sun's rotation is slowing down.

    The Sun, on average, rotates on its axis roughly once per month, but two decades ago, scientists made the baffling discovery that its outer 5 percent spins more slowly than the rest of its interior. And a new study might have finally figured out why.

    "The Sun won't stop spinning anytime soon, but we've discovered that the same solar radiation that heats the Earth is 'braking' the Sun, because of Einstein's Special Relativity, causing it to gradually slow down, starting from its surface," writes lead researcher Jeff Kuhn from the Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii.

    The Sun doesn't spin as a solid mass like Earth does - instead, its parts rotate at different rates depending on their latitude and how far they are from the centre of the Sun. So the poles will spin at a different rate to the equator.

    more at
    https://www.sciencealert.com/the-sun-is-slowing-down-and-scientists-think-they-finally-know-why
    ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
    https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1612/1612.00873.pdf

    A Poynting-Robertson-like drag at the Sun’s surface

    ABSTRACT

    The Sun’s internal rotation Ω(�, Θ) has previously been measured using helioseismology techniques and found to be a complex function of co-latitude, θ, and radius, r. From helioseismology and observations of apparently “rooted” solar magnetic tracers we know that the surface rotates more slowly than much of the interior. The cause of this slow-down is not understood but it is important for understanding stellar rotation generally and any plausible theory of the solar interior. A new analysis using 5-min solar p-mode limb oscillations as a rotation “tracer” finds an even larger velocity gradient in a thin region at the top of the photosphere. This shear occurs where the solar atmosphere radiates energy and angular momentum. We suggest that the net effect of the photospheric angular momentum loss is similar to Poynting-Robertson “photon braking” on, for example, Sun-orbiting dust. The resultant photospheric torque is readily computed and, over the Sun’s lifetime, is found to be comparable to the apparent angular momentum deficit in the near-surface shear layer.
     
    Xelasnave.1947 likes this.
  23. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    9,214
    Indeed. Because that is not how science works, Science is a community, contributing piece-by-piece to a body of knowledge that has a solid foundation and a strongly interconnected structure.

    That way, each of us don't each have to discover every piece of it anew. That's how we can build on each other.

    There are models - of subatomics, of stars, of chemistry, of physics, etc. - that have been shown to be consistent with nature literally countless times. Every experiment - over years and centuries - reconfirms their accuracy. This makes them profoundly strong candidates for building on, and a high confidence that we've got it right.

    You ignore all of this, flattering yourself that it's not necessary to understand centuries of observation and careful construction of the nature of the world around us.

    So you come up with an idea off the top of your head, with absolutely no support - no work - no knowledge - and pretend to yourself that you've literally overthrown the foundations of science (because that's what you're declaring when you pretend that the sun isn't powered by fusion, or that gravity is proportional to rotation).

    I know what you want out of your dalliances in science. You use it to stroke your ego.

    Riv: you must learn what the box is, before you try to think outside it.
     
    origin likes this.

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