The Story of the Universe: : Tutorial :

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by paddoboy, Oct 10, 2015.

  1. Futilitist This so called forum is a fraud... Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,586
    Yes, there damn well still is a paradox. The answer to the paradox you gave was from Oct 7, 2008, before more detailed measurements were made to find out if this assumption was true.

    The article I linked to was from July 3, 2013, almost five years later. The study was done with the latest estimates of what the effect of dark matter should be, but they could not find any measurable effect from dark matter. How do you explain this?

    http://www.technologyreview.com/vie...-why-astronomers-say-it-is-missing-in-action/

    Having taken all this into account, Pitjev and Pitjeva looked for anomalous gravitational effects that might be the result of dark matter. “If dark matter is present in the Solar system, then it should lead to some additional gravitational influence on all bodies,” they say.

    The puzzling news is that Pitjev and Pitjeva find no evidence of this stuff in their analysis. If it is there, its effect must be smaller than the errors in the data.

    Indeed, to satisfy this limit, they calculate that the amount of dark matter within the orbit of Saturn must be tiny. “The dark matter mass in the sphere within Saturn’s orbit should be less than 1.7 10^−10M⊙,” they say. That’s about the mass of a large asteroid.

    So astronomers are left scratching their heads. On the one hand, they say dark matter must hold our galaxy together with a vice-like gravitational grip. On the other, its gravitational effect on the Solar System is negligible. Something has to give.

    This problem of the contradictory effects of dark matter on different scales is fast turning into the most fascinating and urgent problem in physics and astronomy


    -------------------

    The mass of the earth = \(5.972\times 10^{24}kg\). According to your source, the mass of the supposed dark matter within the Earth's orbit = \(2.3\times 10^{12}kg\)! That should produce a measurable effect, but yet, it does not. So the dark matter paradox is alive and well unless you have another answer.



    ---Futilitist

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2015
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    21,647
    Is that right?

    http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblo...hrough-dark-matter-impacts-life-on-earth.html

    February 19, 2015
    "Our Solar System's Milky-Way Orbit Through Dark Matter Impacts Life on Earth"

    http://darkmatterdarkenergy.com/tag/planetary-orbits/
    August 30, 2013



    http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2013/06/26/does-dark-matter-really-exist/



    http://www.academia.edu/1669433/Does_Dark_Matter_accretion_on_Sun_
    and_planets_affect_solar_system_dynamics



    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/dark-matter-seasonal-variation/
    Dark Matter Near Earth Peaks Every March, New Study Suggests
    The sun's gravitational pull on dark matter particles may cause seasonal patterns not previously expected
    By Clara Moskowitz | January 6, 2014



    http://www.nyu.edu/about/news-publi...-mass-extinctions-and-geologic-upheavals.html
    February 19, 2015

    As you can see, besides the overwhelming evidence that DM does exist, some of those links are doing some speculative stuff like mass extinctions etc.
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. river

    Messages:
    9,793
    Oh please pad. They are talking about Cosmic Plasma.
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    21,647
    riv, do you know what you are talking about? seriously?
     
  8. river

    Messages:
    9,793
    Look pad we will discuss when YOU are more familiar with the thinking behind the the theory.
     
  9. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    21,647

    Good point, and it probably is not.

    http://chandra.harvard.edu/press/02_releases/press_073102.html
    Chandra Discovers "Rivers Of Gravity" That Define Cosmic Landscape


    Four independent teams of scientists, whose results appear as separate papers in The Astrophysical Journal, used Chandra to detect intergalactic gas with temperatures ranging from 300,000 to 5 million degrees Celsius. This gas forms part of a gigantic system of hot gas and dark matter that defines the cosmic landscape. The gaseous component alone contains more material than all the stars in the universe.

    “We had strong suspicions from the Big Bang theory and observations of the early universe that this gas exists in the present era, but like a stealth aircraft it had eluded our detection,” said Claude Canizares of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), who along with Taotao Fang, led of one of the teams.

    Here's some more evidence of DM, other than the bullet cluster observable evidence.
    http://astro.ucsc.edu/~nng/webtalks/griest.pdf
     
  10. river

    Messages:
    9,793
    They are talking about Cosmic Plasmas pad.
     
  11. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    21,647
    No zero, nada, zilch, no chance at all...buckleys, about as much chance as a snowball in hell.
    It's only your delusions of grandeur and your efforts to gain some credibility after the hiding in your economic doomsday thread that sees you continually pushing shit up hill.
    How many other forums [not counting this one] have you been banned from for your trolling displays?
     
  12. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    21,647
    This gas forms part of a gigantic system of hot gas and dark matter that defines the cosmic landscape.
     
  13. river

    Messages:
    9,793
    Pad from post # 146:

    They are covertly telling you they are referring to Cosmic Plasmas.
     
  14. river

    Messages:
    9,793
    Rivers of gravity ? From your post # 146
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2015
  15. Futilitist This so called forum is a fraud... Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,586
    Technically (scientifically) speaking the chances are near zero. Infinitesimally small perhaps, but not actually zero.
    I never made any claim that anything I do will ever dethrone the BB King! I was just correcting your false claim that the chances were absolutely zero that the next Einstein could accidentally happen to post something on this sad forum. Even Einstein can make a mistake sometimes.

    But you are still making your false, petty, unscientific, absolute claim. Why? Can your fragile ego ever accept the fact that if the next Einstein did ever post here, you wouldn't be able to recognize it?
    None. Quit being an ass, and just answer the question.

    The mass of the earth = \(5.972\times 10^{24}kg\). According to your source, the mass of the supposed dark matter within the Earth's orbit = \(2.3\times 10^{12}kg\)! That should produce a measurable effect, but yet, it does not. So the dark matter paradox is alive and well unless you have another answer.

    ---EDIT---

    Hey, I just thought of another brilliant idea! Why don't you dash off an email to Lawrence Krauss and get his expert opinion on the dark matter paradox?!

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!





    ---Futilitist

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2015
  16. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    21,647
    No, factually speaking, we are aware that forums such as this are open to all and sundry, nuts, cranks, trolls and those interested in science.
    It is a fact that if anyone of those had anything new to offer, along with any evidence, they most certainly would not be here and would be getting it appropriately peer reviewed.
    But they don't have anything, and must be content with spreading their nonsense on forums such as this, the only place that will entertain them and their nonsense.
    Won't happen, for the reasons stated. So, why are you here on this sad forum? and how many others are you banned from?
    Not false and not petty and no fragile ego my boy. Simply stating mainstream cosmology as it is, which leaves you like the cocky on the biscuit tin, out in the cold!
    Pertinent questions, what are you afraid of?

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    No again according to my many links DM does not create any paradox, and really stop fabricating nonsense. As beer with straw indicated, DM is not evenly distributed, again referenced in a reputable link.
    [1] I don't need to, as I have showed your single link as wrong and speculative.
    [2] His answer would be as mine is I'm reasonably sure.
    [3] Why don't you do it?
    Remembering what nonsense you incorrectly claimed he said last time.


    http://www.sciencedaily.com/news/space_time/dark_matter/
    Dark Matter News
    October 18, 2015

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!


    New Theory Explains Universe's Missing Mass

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!


    A Detector Shines in Search for Dark Matter

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!


    Dark Energy Hiding Behind Matter's Screen?

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!


    Detection of Gamma Rays: Dark Matter?
     
  17. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    21,647
    Yes, rivers of gravity from my post 146...how observant of you.
    You see, DM only interacts gravitationally.


    http://home.web.cern.ch/about/physics/dark-matter

    Dark matter
    Invisible dark matter makes up most of the universe – but we can only detect it from its gravitational effects

    Standard Model. Experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may provide more direct clues about dark matter.

    Many theories say the dark matter particles would be light enough to be produced at the LHC. If they were created at the LHC, they would escape through the detectors unnoticed. However, they would carry away energy and momentum, so physicists could infer their existence from the amount of energy and momentum “missing” after a collision. Dark matter candidates arise frequently in theories that suggest physics beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and extra dimensions. One theory suggests the existence of a “Hidden Valley”, a parallel world made of dark matter having very little in common with matter we know. If one of these theories proved to be true, it could help scientists gain a better understanding of the composition of our universe and, in particular, how galaxies hold together.

    Dark energy
    Dark energy makes up approximately 68% of the universe and appears to be associated with the vacuum in space. It is distributed evenly throughout the universe, not only in space but also in time – in other words, its effect is not diluted as the universe expands. The even distribution means that dark energy does not have any local gravitational effects, but rather a global effect on the universe as a whole. This leads to a repulsive force, which tends to accelerate the expansion of the universe. The rate of expansion and its acceleration can be measured by observations based on the Hubble law. These measurements, together with other scientific data, have confirmed the existence of dark energy and provide an estimate of just how much of this mysterious substance exists.
     
  18. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    21,647
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/a...orce-that-the-rest-of-the-universe-does-not1/

    Dark Matter May Feel a “Dark Force” That the Rest of the Universe Does Not
    Astronomers watching galaxies collide found evidence of nongravitational forces that could suggest dark matter interacts with itself
    By Clara Moskowitz | April 20, 2015


    After decades of studying dark matter scientists have repeatedly found evidence of what it cannot be but very few signs of what it is. That might have just changed. A study of four colliding galaxies for the first time suggests that the dark matter in them may be interacting with itself through some unknown force other than gravity that has no effect on ordinary matter. The finding could be a significant clue as to what comprises the invisible stuff that is thought to contribute 24 percent of the universe.

    more at link......
     
  19. river

    Messages:
    9,793
    Cosmic Plasmas are invisable.

    And they have a spider web of filaments ; river of gravity so to speak.
     
  20. Daecon Kiwi fruit Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,068
    Where do you get that from?
     
  21. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    21,647

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!


    Have you read the article? or are you carried away by the mention of plasma...because, really you are making no sense.

    The hot gas detected by Chandra can be used to trace the presence of the more massive dark matter component. The discovery of the hot gas may eventually enable astronomers to map of the distribution of dark matter in the universe and perhaps understand its origin.

    Plasma or otherwise, it's the gravity of it that shapes the landscape.
     
  22. river

    Messages:
    9,793
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2015
  23. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    21,647
    paper by Vera Rubin, the astronomer responsible for the validation of DM......

    http://risa.stanford.edu/compton/Rubin98.pdf

    extract:
    Where Is Dark Matter?
    Several teams search nightly for nearby lensing events, caused by invisible MACHOs in our own Milky Way’s halo. The search for them covers millions of stars in the Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda galaxy. Ultimately, the search will limit the amount of dark matter present in our galaxy’s halo. Given the strong evidence that spiral and elliptical galaxies lie embedded in large dark-matter halos, astronomers now wonder about the location, amount and distribution of the invisible material. To answer those questions, researchers compare and contrast observations from specific nearby galaxies. For instance, we learn from the motions of the Magellanic Clouds, two satellite galaxies gloriously visible in the Southern Hemisphere, that they orbit within the Milky Way galaxy’s halo and that the halo continues beyond the clouds, spanning a distance of almost 300,000 light-years. In fact, motions of our galaxy’s most distant satellite objects suggest that its halo may extend twice as far—to 600,000 light-years. Because our nearest neighboring spiral galaxy, Andromeda, lies a mere two million light-years away, we now realize that our galaxy’s halo may indeed span a significant fraction of the distance to Andromeda and its halo. We have also determined that clusters of galaxies lie embedded in even larger systems of dark matter. At the farthest distances for which we can deduce the masses of galaxies, dark matter appears to dwarf luminous matter by a factor of at least 10, possibly as much as 100. Overall, we believe dark matter associates loosely with bright matter, because the two often appear together. Yet, admittedly, this conclusion may stem from biased observations, because bright matter typically enables us to find dark matter. By meticulously studying the shapes and motions of galaxies over decades, astronomers have realized that individual galaxies are actively evolving, largely because of the mutual gravitational pull of galactic neighbors. Within individual galaxies, stars remain enormously far apart relative to their diameters, thus little affecting one another gravitationally. For example, the separation between the sun and its nearest neighbor, Proxima Centauri, is so great that 30 million suns could fit between the two. In contrast, galaxies lie close together, relative to their diameters—nearly all have neighbors within a few diameters. So galaxies do alter one another gravitationally, with dark matter’s added gravity a major contributor to these interactions.



    The Author VERA RUBIN is a staff member at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, where she has been since 1965. That same year, she became the first woman permitted to observe at Palomar Observatory. The author of more than 200 papers on the structure of the Milky Way, motions within galaxies and large-scale motions in the universe, she received Carnegie Mellon University’s Dickson Prize for Science in 1994 and the Royal Astronomical Society’s Gold Medal in 1996. President Bill Clinton awarded her the National Medal of Science in 1993 and appointed her to the President’s Committee on the National Medal of Science in 1995
     

Share This Page