The other side of the world. Antipodes.

Discussion in 'Earth Science' started by sweetpea, Aug 14, 2018.

  1. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    Yes but not quite antipodal.

    These are geographical features thousands of kilometres across (both the largest in the Solar System), on a planet with 3/10ths the area of Earth.
    Oh yeah, and on the edge of the bulge: the deepest, widest crustal rip in the Solar System: Valles Canyon.

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  3. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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  5. Dr_Toad It's green! Valued Senior Member

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    Planets are bouncy if you hit them hard enough. Maybe harmonics plus the angular velocity could conspire to shift the antipodal features by that much?

    Just a random thought...
     
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  7. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    If an impact cause a noticeable bulge on the other side of the planet it wouldn't last long, just long enough for the shattered planet to disperse.
     
  8. Dr_Toad It's green! Valued Senior Member

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    That might depend on when the impact occurred: If this happened during the "late heavy bombardment", the planet might have been just a bit more bouncy.

    That's why we fund $500K grants for people who might find new science.
     

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