The orbit of electrons

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by Prosoothus, Nov 10, 2002.

  1. chroot Crackpot killer Registered Senior Member

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    Nasor:

    Yes, that's why I prefer the term 'probabilistic' over the term 'random.' Mathematically, 'random' is a perfectly acceptable term, but many people confuse randomness with the lack of a probability distribution. Naturally, a random variable can actually have any probability distribution you can dream up. A random variable is just one whose current value does not depend on any of its past values.

    - Warren
     
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  3. Nasor Valued Senior Member

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    I thought that the mathematical definition of 'random' was that the present value is not in any way related to its past values. So you couldn't look at a large list of past values and use it to make predictions about what the present or future value would be.
     
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  5. chroot Crackpot killer Registered Senior Member

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    It is.
    You can't predict an exact future value; but you can certainly predict probabilities for each possible value.

    You don't know the result of your next coin toss; but you know the odds are 50/50 heads/tails.

    - Warren
     
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  7. ChristCrusher Registered Senior Member

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    take a fucking math class.

    learn to solve D.E.'s

    no asshat on this forum will explain this better to you than 2 pages of simple calculations
     
  8. ChristCrusher Registered Senior Member

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    nice to see we are always at steady state...
     
  9. ChristCrusher Registered Senior Member

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    i will offer nothing further to this we-todd-did thread other than anyone who is still confused on orbitals and wavefunctions, please quit thinking in terms of simplistic continuous spatial functions , and start thinking in terms of vectors and matrices.
     
  10. ChristCrusher Registered Senior Member

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    because you arent looking for the fourier transform of a complex exponential to find the momentum of non-quantum objects.
     

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