The Hindus-An Alternative History

Discussion in 'Eastern Philosophy' started by kmguru, Mar 2, 2010.

  1. kmguru Staff Member

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    Just as Christianity has thousands of denominations each with their version of interpretation, Hindus have many more times....

    Most stories are just parables, a teaching tool

    But whether Ramayana and Mahabharata really happened, no one has done any archeological digs to find out for sure.

    So, each Hindu would have his/her interpretation of those stories...
     
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  3. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    Apparently some of the stories are based on historical events and real people, but all the Indians I've met in the USA--a couple of dozen, I suppose--recognize the rest as metaphors.
     
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  5. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    I wonder how much they are influenced by where they live. Most desis in the US are whiter than white, as we call them.

    example:

    I wouldn't consider them as representative of anything but American values

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  7. kmguru Staff Member

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    That is how blacks think too. My black friend does not have a black accent. Therefore he is accused of being "white" by his black friends.
     
  8. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    Everyone's skin lightens after living in a northern latitude for a few years, but the ones from southern India are much darker than Obama.

    What I've been told is that an educated Indian Hindu--anywhere--is much more likely to understand his religion as a collection of metaphors than an educated American Christian.
    I suppose everyone starts to seem foreign to his countrymen after living in another land. But they sure don't seem "American" to us. High incidence of vegetarianism, and even the meat eaters have their one day a week without it in honor of their (admittedly imaginary) family god. Too much emphasis on work and not enough on fun. Strong family cohesion and loyalty. No public displays of affection, no flirting, no sexual banter. Those are not American values.

    One thing they all have in common is being repulsed by the class system.

    In any country, the people who are willing to leave and make a home somewhere else are going to have qualitatively different attitudes from the ones who decide to stay there. So you're right that it's risky to judge a people by its emigrants.

    Nonetheless, as immigrant communities go, the first-generation Indian-Americans are pretty foreign. Their children will be Americanized, but they're not. They're caught in between.
     
  9. kmguru Staff Member

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    YUP

    Even a first generation married to an American (White, Hispanic etc) would have absorbed the culture to a large extent.

    Children...not necessarily caught in between. I had an Indian colleague who was born and raised here...he was well adjusted to the American culture and finally married to a blond.
     
  10. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    Christians are much more reluctant to see anything as a metaphor.
     
  11. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    Whiter than white refers to acting white not skin colour. It harks back to our name for the English, the goras
     
  12. quadraphonics Bloodthirsty Barbarian Valued Senior Member

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    Most of the ones I interact with regularly have lived in the US for substantially less time than you did. So either they're representative of (a certain slice of) Indian culture, or you aren't, or your whole thesis about cultural influence is bunk to begin with.

    Any salient differences about the interpretation of scripture are probably best explained by noting that Indian Americans are disproportionately drawn from the highly educated, technical classes. These are engineers, doctors and scientists we're talking about here, and those types tend to have little patience for outright mysticism. On the other hand, recognizing scripture as metaphor - rather than literal truth - is not a widely-observed strength of American culture, so one would be hard-pressed to see how immigrants would pick up such a stance from living here.

    Meanwhile, I've never heard this term "whiter than white." But I've heard the terms "coconut" and "ABCD" pretty regularly.
     
  13. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    Could you explain that a little more deeply.
    Has it anything to do with mixed race Indians?
     
  14. UltiTruth In pursuit... Registered Senior Member

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    Actually, the trait to look at the content of scriptures as metaphors is not necessarily to do with education or social standing - though it might be at a different level with specific groups.

    As an example, Rama is not revered because of his valor or physical strength - but for the qualities of persistence, truthfulness, devotion to his cause and values - a change agent (God) in an age where this was all not the norm. Hanuman is revered for his absolute devotion to his master and a cause - not for his physical ability to jump long distances or kill the demons. Even today, where devotion needs exemplified in any field by a Hindu, Hanuman is referred to as inspiration.

    This view exists not just in the "whiter than whites" but even in the "darker than the dark, uneducated people" who toil in the Indian Sun in the innermost hamlets. You will hear priests in temples even there talking about the inner abstract representations of what the epics and scriptures say.
     
  15. rcscwc Registered Senior Member

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    Pal, it is not so B/W thingy. Not all Americans understand Hinduism, nay, are not prepared to do so. Americans started with viewing Hinduism as satanism, then to a "strange" religion, then a mysterious system. From hate it has changed to absence of hate, but does it mean love too? NO.

    who would do it? There is no dearth of "scholars" who would deliberately distort the facts, this book is an exzample. I assure you that all the errors pointed out are REAL. I rather believe that they are insidious.

    Who would do it? Know about numerals, place value system and rules of computation? Everyone in the west staeted with believing they were Arabic in origin [basis? NIL. Except that they got it from Arabs]. Then it dawned upon them that the Arabs had credited Hindus!!! What happened?? GRUDGINGLY, they said: OK, Indo-Arabic. Hahaha.

    Mostly by English "scholars". Take a recent example. Who conquored the S. Pole? Was it Amundsen or Scot? Amundesn reached S. Pole fully ONE month before Scot did. He spent 3 days there making observations and trying to fix the EXACT location of S. Pole. Yet look at maps, histories. S. Pole: Amundsen-Scot, as if they reached it the same day!!



    No. i absolve them. I am a Hindu.

    Buddhists could not do it without repudiating their roots.

    Then who? Do I need to draw a map here?
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2010
  16. rcscwc Registered Senior Member

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    Like to disprove any thing?
     
  17. rcscwc Registered Senior Member

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    Now, now. SAM, why should you know about advanced Indian culture?: After all, everything started with Islam and Mo. Ha. But for Mo, nobody would know that mother's milk is invaluable for an infant!!!

    SAM, I don't know why you are a Mod at all?

    Muslim Barbie, A figure hidden in a TENT.
    Anyone wantimng a pic might see IGLOO on google.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2010
  18. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    Don't be silly. What is an "advanced Indian"? Some one who speaks English? Are some Indians "work in progress"? I don't accept that westernised Indians are more "advanced" - who is more well versed in Indian culture? The ABCD or the Indian brought up in an Indian ethos? Who is more "advanced" as an Indian?
     
  19. rcscwc Registered Senior Member

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    721
    Evasive now?
     
  20. rcscwc Registered Senior Member

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    Source for terming Kali a demon? Not epistemology out of your ass.
    Source for her incarnation as a king? Not your ass please.


    Source? Not your ass please.
     
  21. rcscwc Registered Senior Member

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    Haha. Then Wapedia is WRONG and someone pulled it out of his ass. Get me a refrence from Mahabharata, not your ass.
     
  22. rcscwc Registered Senior Member

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    In fact you know nothing. SAM is muslim, and muslims do not wear dhotis. Period.

    Dhoti for a woman is called a sari, and many muslim women too wear it. Many xian women too. In fact office going women mostly wear saris, just as teachers do.

    A suit with salwar is aka Punjabi suit and is nearly a pan Indian dress for young women and girls.


    Hmm. In fact more of your posts I see, the more I am convinced that you are a prejudiced ass, with very shallow knowledge about India.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2010
  23. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    Muslims do not wear dhotis? Yes we do, only we call it a lungi or a sarong! Its the most common garment in Muslims in India! Thats what most of them wear at home!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lungi

    Its just not pulled up at the back like a Marathi saree
     

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