The Higgs is dead, long lives the Higgs

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by thed, Dec 13, 2001.

  1. thed IT Gopher Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,105
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. rde Eukaryotic specimen Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    278
    It's looking less likely that it'll be found, but I wouldn't give up yet.
    I do think it'd be rather cool if it wasn't there, though.

    BTW: thanks for linking, rather than pasting other people's work verbatim, which seems to be the norm around here.
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. Mr. G reality.sys Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    Mystery lover? Yeah.

    Not everyone follows links, thus foregoing inquisitive energies expenditure.

    There's a useful place in public discourse for verbatim reiteration.
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. rde Eukaryotic specimen Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    278
    Unfortunately, those who paste tend to be lazy about it, ignoring the rich vein of hyperlinks that often accompany these texts. Instead of following one link (is middle-clicking really that hard?) to a story with myriad paths to follow, we're given a chunk of text, often without context.

    I shouldn't complain. Obviously it only annoys me, and it's off-topic anyway.

    So: to get back on topic: er... I wonder will the find they Higgs boson at the remaining energy levels.
     
  8. Dreamsa Dare to Dream! Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    125
    The Standard Model may give wrong prediction. It may need to be revised. Therefore the prediction on the energy which Higgs bosons will form may be wrong and the Higgs bosons may be find at even higher energy.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!


    The Standard Model is challenged by experiment
     
  9. nanok Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    30
    isn't there another collider called ssc, (superconducting super collider) somewhere? i read that it was going to be able to operate at 40 TeV......am i correct? and that the cern one will operate at 17 TeV?
     
  10. Dreamsa Dare to Dream! Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    125
    Hi!
    Wanna ask what's the theorectical prediction of the Higgs Bosons now???

    I don't know about the colliders!
     
  11. Mr. G reality.sys Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,109
    The existence or non-existence of the Higgs Field regardless is a very weighty issue.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  12. John Devers (AVATAR) Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    120
    I have just read this quote below and it seems that there will be a lot of problems if they dont find the Higgs boson, there is also no reason to think that it wont be foud with higher energies.


    <FONT COLOR=blue> "The Higgs field and its quantum the Higgs particle are used in the Standard Model to give mass to the W+, W- and Z0 weak bosons. Without it the theory would predict that these particles had zero mass. But their masses are a matter of experimental fact, so without the Higgs, present day explanations of what happen in the accelerators falls apart."</font>
     
  13. Dreamsa Dare to Dream! Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    125
    Relax......

    May be just a little modification on the Standard Model can solve the problem.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  14. Weitzel Simon Fraser University Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    51
    By 2004 there may be even more reason to doubt the Standard Model... This observatory they're building may be able to detect the extra, hidden dimensions proposed by string theory and outlawed by the Standard Model. Read:

    http://www.nature.com/nsu/020107/020107-1.html

    Thoughts?
     

Share This Page