The cheapest way to save your own lives...

Discussion in 'Science & Society' started by ULTRA, Mar 5, 2011.

  1. ULTRA Realistically Surreal Registered Senior Member

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    1,555
    Recent studies have shown that a moderately low dose of asprin prevents the formation of a range of agressive cancers.

    Here's a few links to background articles..

    http://www.nhs.uk/news/2010/12December/Pages/aspirin-and-cancer-risk.aspx

    http://www.nhs.uk/news/2010/12December/Pages/aspirin-and-cancer-risk.aspx

    http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&so...hkCZ9W4w_ic1UcA6Q&sig2=5yT0DlbjO9JYwFDx0d6J4w

    http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&so..._k5_Wq0ydQ94rMRYg&sig2=a8furnAroNIUrwUbFXyCxA

    For as little as a penny a day, a low dose of asprin, 75mg, can reduce the formation of these cancers. This would ideally be taken by people in thier early forties as it is at this age that precursor cells form that later develop into cancer. The thinking is that taking just a quarter of a standard tablet every day over a number of years provides a reduction in malignant cancers by as much as 40%

    However, people with stomach ulcers and similar problems should avoid asprin as it can lead to internal bleeding. In most cases, this is not serious but can be problematic or even dangerous. Therefore people sensitive to asprin should not take it without proper medical advice. People taking Warfarin also need to take advice as asprin also thins the blood. Many people take asprin in lieu of Warfarin for its blood thinning and anti-clotting properties.

    I personally have started a regimen consisting of one 300mg dose a day even though I have had stomach problems in the past. However, as little as a quarter of a tablet has a measurable benefit. I feel the risk of a small bleed is outweighed by the overwhelmingly beneficial anti-cancer properties. The drug has to be taken over a period of years to maintain its protective shield. To me, this is no hardship, and with a history of cancer in the family it just makes sense. I am also happier knowing asprin is a naturally derived compound. (originally from the ark of Willow tres)

    I certainly thought I'd share this information here in case you'd not heard about these amazing new-found properties of a familliar old analgesic.
     
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  3. WillNever Valued Senior Member

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    75 or 81 mg of aspirin might be good, but why are you taking 300mg every day? Do you have cardiovascular disease or HTN?

    Over time, chronic use of higher doses of aspirin are bad for your kidneys if you are taking other drugs as well.

    I would definitely not take higher doses of aspirin daily than is recommended for someone who is not at risk. These kinds of things protective effects generally are not cases of "more is better."
     
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  5. ULTRA Realistically Surreal Registered Senior Member

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    The stated dose for analgesia, its primary use, is 1-3 300mg tablets up to 4 times a day. I take just one tablet once a day, as I'm not convinced taking more would be beneficial.
     
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  7. WillNever Valued Senior Member

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    2,555
    Right, but 300mg/day is still more than is recommended for prophylaxis of cardiac events in people not at risk. And you need a high dose for cancer protection -- which is still not substantiated. It hasn't been made clear if the anti-cancer properties outweigh the hepatic and renal impairment that can occur after long term high dose aspirin therapy.

    ~75mg of aspirin/day has been shown to be as effective as higher doses in most people. Only people who have cardiovascular disease have been shown to benefit from doses higher than that.

    The people who we give the daily 325mg aspirin tablets to at the hospital are all in their 70s and 80s. Are you that old? If not, you are probably taking more than is beneficial... and it can potentially hurt your kidneys and liver if you take that every day with your other psychiatric medication for a long time.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2011
  8. ULTRA Realistically Surreal Registered Senior Member

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    1,555
    I note your point, Will. I am 41 years old, so am in the target age-range of the anti-cancer therapy. I only take the 300mg dose as I find the analgesia helps me get to sleep with all my damaged bones, and I just never bothered to break a tablet up. As you say, i already have a load of other medications to metabolise but my liver function is unimpaired. I am not unduly concerned as the dose I'm taking is relatively low compared to the indicated doses available. However, if any issues do develop I will possibly reduce the dose by a half, or even a quarter as only a tiny dose of asprin appears to be very effective.
     
  9. ULTRA Realistically Surreal Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,555
    I just thought this would be a simple, cost-effective way for fellow SciForumers to protect themselves from the terrible scourge that is cancer..But it takes a few years to get the benefit - so if you don't have cancer now, then now is the perfect time to start with this impressive-looking anti-cancer shield.
     
  10. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

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    3,247
    Regular exercise, healthy diet and no smoking can go a long ways in that regard too.

    The doc wants me to eat a regular aspirin every day (for the statistical advantage as I am 60 years old) but after 2 - 3 days my stomach goes South. After a week I start to bleed real easy. Having had a nose bleed once that went on for almost 2 days and put me in the ER I have to pass on the regular aspirin now. I take them for a headache though. If it goes on for too long I switch to Tylenol or Motrin so my stomach doesn't get too messed up.
     
  11. Cellar_Door Whose Worth's unknown Registered Senior Member

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    1,310
    Exactly what I was going to say. Cutting down on alcohol and spending time away from the urban environment wouldn't go amiss either.
     
  12. chimpkin C'mon, get happy! Registered Senior Member

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    I'm already doing the white tea chug...
    Aspirin makes me barf.
     
  13. ULTRA Realistically Surreal Registered Senior Member

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    1,555
    Well, I did say it's not for everyone. Its just that if you can take it, it might help save you from getting various life-threatning cancers. Maybe you could make a tea with a little willow-bark in it..I like green tea with honey and lemon in it..In fact i'm gonna make some right now..It is high in anti-oxidants which combat dangerous free radicals found in burned toast and meat among other things..
     
  14. chimpkin C'mon, get happy! Registered Senior Member

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    I do appreciate the thought, yanno.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    It was a nice thought.

    What I really need to do to prevent cancer is move. If it's not already too late, I've lived here since I was 8.

    I live downwind of where most of America gets all of its' gasoline and petrochemical products from... and the plants aren't regulated enough.

    That's why the plants stink so badly...the stink has benzene, toluene, and various other -ene's along with formaldehyde and sulfur compounds...it smells like a mixture of vomit and cat pee in the neighborhoods nearest the plant complexes-I can't go shop at the big-box store next to one plant b/c just a quick walk from the parking lot to the air-conditioned store will make my lungs feel burnt for over a day...
    The area I live in has double the expected background cancer rate. So, um, yeah...drink white tea...:bugeye:
     
  15. John99 Banned Banned

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    22,046
  16. John99 Banned Banned

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    22,046
    What makes you think that?
     
  17. John99 Banned Banned

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    22,046
    What are your sources?
     
  18. ULTRA Realistically Surreal Registered Senior Member

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    1,555
    John, read this. As usual, you are quite wrong in your assumptions. We have known about free radicals, where they come from and how anti-oxidants work for years and years and years. You can find out about them on just about any health site. The science is not in doubt, having been proven time and time again. Were you never told to eat your vegetables?

    It's rich that you ask for citations when you've never provided any yourself - that's why you got banned. If you're gonna start trolling here I'll be seeking further sanctions. So do yourself a favour and read this: http://www.rice.edu/~jenky/sports/antiox.html
     
  19. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    24,690
    I can't take NSAID's like aspirin and ibuprofen because I have a history of ulcers AND acid reflux.
    The primary purpose of life is not to extend itself! You're supposed to have some fun along the way. Living out in the middle of nowhere where you'll be lucky to see a live concert or a museum exhibit twice a year, giving up alcohol and all drugs, eating a lot of vegetables, and spending two hours a day jogging... well it may not make your life any longer, but it will sure feel like it.
     
  20. Skeptical Registered Senior Member

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    1,449
    There are no health secrets. We all know about eating fruit and veges and high fibre, and getting exercise, not smoking and not drinking alcohol to excess. Aspirin in small doses can confer benefits, but there is some data showing detrement also.

    To live a long time, it is also useful to live in Okinawa, lead an active social life, be happily married, have low stress, meditate regularly, get lots of sleep ..........

    Who the hell can be bothered!
    A little common sense. A balanced diet. Not smoking. Moderate regular exercise. A little nice red wine - no wait, that is for pleasure, not health. What the hell - cheers mate!
     
  21. chimpkin C'mon, get happy! Registered Senior Member

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    Quite frankly, I live like I do b/c I want to live healthier, as well as longer. I like having a body I can do things in, like run distances, plant a tree, or move some furniture...or fix a house. Since I'm still fighting off chronic sinusitis, that's a work in progress.

    My grandmother died at 62, taking three years, the end result of type 2 diabetes she was delinquent about controlling, and she was very obese.
    Seeing her really awful end was a really hard lesson in the end results of allowing myself to eat in an uncontrolled way...and I've been taking better care of myself ever since. Not always perfect, but better.
    Not so much my family, they're all stereotypically huge Americans.

    One of the anti-aging "tricks" that research seems to be bearing out: caloric restriction.
    However, in humans there's evidence that protein also needs to be somewhat restricted.
    Chances are I'm going to be doing this...well, for a long time.
    You see, at 60 I want to still be strong and active, like the interviewees in this article on caloric restriction: http://pubs.acs.org/cen/science/87/8731sci2.html
    I doubt I can live to be 100, my genes are too crappy for that...it's more that I want to put off decrepitude as long as I can.
     
  22. Skeptical Registered Senior Member

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    1,449
    Chimpkin

    I am 62, and I am fit and active. My blood pressure and cholesterol are low, and my lung capacity and my heart's ability to work are high. In some exercises, I can outperform people 20 years younger.

    I have never tried caloric restriction or excess exercise, and I do not believe either are required. As Fraggle said, you may not live longer, but it will feel like it!

    The old saying about moderation in all things also applies to healthy living. Moderate exercise, and moderate concern with diet. The only absolute is an absolute prohibition on smoking.
     
  23. ULTRA Realistically Surreal Registered Senior Member

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    1,555
    Nice one Chimpkin. I hope no-one was thinking I was promoting a reliance on pills for thier future health. I was thinking that the cancer-shield effect of asprin would benefit someone, but there is no substitute for healthy eating and regular excercise. Obviously if you put in more kcalories than you can use, you're gonna get fat and unhealthy. Eating vitamin rich foods are always preferable to taking supplements. Supplements do not work as well as the stuff nature provides. Avoidance of refined sugar and carbohydrate are a good place to start. Unsaturated fats and fish oils can even help your heart, and avoidance of red meat will reduce bowel cancer and digestive problems.
    It's just common-sense but I think people try and change everything at once and give up when they fail.
    Keep it simple, and you won't go far wrong.
     

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