The Battle of Midway was the Turning Point of WWII

Discussion in 'History' started by Buffalo Roam, May 9, 2010.

  1. Nasor Valued Senior Member

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    Arguably the turning point was when the allies broke the JN-25 code, allowing them to read the IJN's mail. This was what made Midway possible.
     
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  3. pjdude1219 screw watergate i want to know about zaragate Valued Senior Member

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    pearl was a failure. they were after the carriers
     
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  5. Buffalo Roam Registered Senior Member

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    Yes, 31,00 died, fed in piecemeal, with improper support and supply, because Japan didn't have the naval air power to protect the convoys as they ran in, the other fact is that most of those Japanese who died, died due to lack of medical care for the wounded, disease, and starvation.
     
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  7. Buffalo Roam Registered Senior Member

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    Only in your dreams, at the begining of WWII Japan had a population of aprox 71 million people, China had 400 million.
     
  8. fedr808 1100101 Valued Senior Member

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    No, actually considering the goal which was to keep the allies from mounting a significant counterattack for a good year they pretty much succeeded for the most part.

    Pearl was a success, it's just that it did not end up helping Japan nearly as much as they had hoped.
     
  9. fedr808 1100101 Valued Senior Member

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    So what exactly? Are you saying the life of a sick and weak but battlehardened and brave warrior is worth less than a comfortable soldier?

    The battle of Midway was just as one sided if not more so.
     
  10. Buffalo Roam Registered Senior Member

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    It didn't ned to destroy the fleet at Midway, all it needed to do was change the balance of power, and by Midway, the power of naval action had changed from Battleships to Aircraft Carriers, with out the Carriers to protect the rest of the Japanese fleet, the Japanese fleet became nothing but target.

    Even after the loss of 4 carriers at Midway the Japanese Fleet still had more tonnage, guns, more surface fire power than the American Fleet, 4 battleships, 13 cruisers, and 33 destroyers, so why did they with draw from Midway?

    Because the surviving carriers of the U.S. fleet would have savage Yamamotos forces, again the Aircraft carrier was now the supreme capital ship in naval power.

    ps: Midway from the beginning was always a trap to destroy the Carriers and the rest of the U.S. naval forces in the Pacific.

    Yamamoto's major primary strategic concern was to eliminate the remaining American carrier forces, which he perceived as the major obstacle to the Japan's Pacific campaign objectives.

    H.P. Willmott, Barrier and the Javelin; Lundstrom, First South Pacific Campaign; Parshall and Tully, Shattered Sword, pp. 19–38.

    Dull, The Imperial Japanese Navy: A Battle History, p.166; Willmott, The Barrier and the Javelin, pp.519–523; Prange, Miracle at Midway p.395; Parshall and Tully, Shattered Sword, pp.416–430.
     
  11. fedr808 1100101 Valued Senior Member

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    6,706
    Actually your wrong, that change of power came in the battle of the Coral sea. That is a fact.


    What's your point? It doesn't change the fact that the battle of Guadalcanal was by definition the turning point of the Pacific war.


    P.S. your wrong.
     
  12. Buffalo Roam Registered Senior Member

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    fedr808, just because you say I am wrong doesn't make it true.

    The Coral Sea was a tactical draw, we lost one, and had one damaged, they lost one and had two damage, after Coral Sea, the Japanese still fielded 4 operational Fleet Carriers and 2 Light Carrier, at Midway, 2 Fleet Carriers carriers at the Aleutian Islands so I don't see how you can claim that;

    At the very best, we put 3 Carriers into the fight, by the miracle of the repair crews at Pearl Harbor against 6 Carriers of the Japanese, so where do you come up with "that change of power came in the battle of the Coral sea"?

    The Japanese went into Midway with overwhelming superiority, and ego, and that is where their alligator ego overloaded their tweety bird ass's and Nimitz handed their ass's them.

    Nimitz was where He wasn't suppose to be, Yamamoto and the Japanese planned on Him waiting at Pearl Harbor, or chasing the Attack at Dutch Harbor, but because of Commander Joseph P. Rochefort, and the code breakers at Pearl, we had just enough hard intelligence to position our forces to ambush the Japanese, and the luck of the draw that the one search plane that could have spotted the carriers was late in getting or the launch rail.

    Cut it any way you want, but when you go into a battle down 6 to 3, and win, that is a critical turning point in any war, and it took place a year before Guadalcanal was invaded with out the victory at Midway Guadalcanal could have never been attempted and never would have been launched.

    I will play you in any War Game scenario you want, as the Japanese side winning at Midway, and see just how far you will get trying to launch any attack at Guadalcanal in 1943.
     
  13. Shogun Bleed White and Blue! Valued Senior Member

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    If they started a war between KMT and Communists sooner and take part in helping the KMT first, then defeat the KMT, it is possible.
     

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