"Taliswoman"...

Discussion in 'Linguistics' started by Sarkus, May 1, 2022.

  1. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    Stupid

    "homeless people" operative word "homeless" = focus on the word homeless drawing attention to lack of homes FOR people

    "people experiencing homelessness" operative words "people experiencing" = are they a bunch of politicians sleeping outside with homeless people to have a one night experience? (The situation has happened)

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  3. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    No. The whole point of the term change is to TREAT THEM AS PEOPLE.
    The word "Homeless" is NOT A PERSON.


    Talking about "homeless" dehumanizes the person. It is as simple as that.
     
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  5. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    And so is changing "by 2021".

    "Beginning in the 1910s", Zeppelins were fairly common - but "by 1940" that changed.
    Yes.
    I myself am a woke-advocate. I'm not a third party.
    "Woke" is a weasel-word. It's an all-talk-and-no-action word.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2022
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  7. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    Moi is wishing my "go back to sleep" on those who highjacked woke at the start and now, observing how woke is being passed around I truely feel sorry for woke

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  8. Sarkus Hippomonstrosesquippedalo phobe Valued Senior Member

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    Maybe awkwardly phrased, but the main point I was trying to make was that they are not their condition, as you more elegantly stated. Whether temporary condition or not....
    Given that sideshowbob says that they have used it also for people with disabilities, I would agree with you.
     
  9. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    Perhaps myself being a mild disletic I place a different emphasis on different words which gives, for me, a different angle of view

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  10. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Nonsenense.

    I've also heard them call those people "houseless".

    I am houseless. I live in an apartment.

    The term homeless emphasizes the problem. Yes, it is humans who are homeless but the fact that they are homeless is the real issue, not whether or not they are humans.
     
  11. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 72 years oldl Valued Senior Member

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    The "homeless" - stressing the less in the operative word homeless helps

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  12. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    I think you're being argumentative.
    I was a full grown adult in 2010, and used the term "woke" in its original meaning.
    I am not obliged to "upgrade" to the latest faddish use of the term.
    If I am talking about woke in the context of "alert to social and racial injustice", that is not by any means archaic.

    I'm not sure what you're saying here. You consider yourself superior and use the term on yourself in a perjorative way?


    No. The perjorative has risen to the fore. That doesn't oblige everyone to upgrade.

    I have friend whose name is Karen. When I call her, am I actually calling her out as privileged? No. Other people don't get to change meanings on my behalf ofr words that are still in current use.
     
  13. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    "Experiencing homelessness" has the same less in it. Being homeless does not imply being less human.
     
  14. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    This is exactly backwards.

    The problem is that those who have the power to do something about it don't have to think about the people, they effectively say "homelessness is a problem in the city". No mention of the people who experience misery, ill health (physical and mental), employment, family etc.

    Throw some money at some houses and the problem goes away. No it doesn't.
     
  15. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    You are if you don't want an argument.

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    I don't use the word to describe myself - or anybody else. You can be woke without telling anybody you are.
     
  16. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    "Being homeless" doesn't have the word "human" in it at all.
     
  17. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    How is that different from saying, "people experiencing homelessness is a problem in this city?" That makes it sound like the people are the problem.
     
  18. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    We don't call them "disabled people"; we call them "people with disabilities". The logic is that they are people first. Their condition is not their identity.

    "The blind guy" is as stereotyped as "the black guy".
    He's not "The blind guy"; he's "The guy. With visual impairment."
     
  19. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Neither does "being healthy." Every phrase doesn't have to emphasize humanity.

    The stress ought to be on the homelessness, not on the humanity.
     
  20. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Calling them "disabled people" in no way implies that. The disability is the operative word. They have special needs because they are disabled, not because they are people.
     
  21. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    This is exactly backwards.

    The stress must be put on humanity. That's the priority. Houses are simply one tool. There are many, many other tools to help marginalized people.

    Smarter minds than ours have put a lot of effort into this, I will find sources. Be patient.

    "A rights-based approach to homelessness prevention means changing the way policy decisions and investments are made and ensures that a policy and funding framework is in place to hold all orders of government responsible for addressing their role in preventing people from becoming homeless, including health, child protection, justice, and others."
    -homelesshub.ca


    Bells: help me out here. Surely this is in your wheelhouse. What is the "science" behind "people first, special needs second"? I know I am right on this; how can I cite an authority on it?
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2022
  22. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

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    No. They have the same needs as everyone else.

    They need to cross the street in heavy traffic.
    They need to get to their third floor apartment.
    They need a job to put a roof over their heads.

    Those are things we must consider for everyone. They are not special needs. It just happens that so far we've only set up the crosswalks for people with working eyes. We've only set up apartments for people who can get to the third floor with stairs. We've set up workplaces to cater to those who can work an eight hour shift unsupervised.

    That many of us have it easy is not their problem. They pay the same taxes as anyone and vote just like anyone. We don't cater merely to the abilities of the many; we cater to all citizens according to their rights. And we all have the same rights.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2022
  23. Motor Daddy Valued Senior Member

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    If a person is in a wheelchair and needs to get into a house that has steps, then they have a SPECIAL NEED for a wheelchair ramp.

    The reason it is a SPECIAL NEED is because very few people require a wheelchair ramp to get into the house. So the need for a wheelchair ramp is a special need.

    Sure everyone needs to get into their house, but not many people need a ramp to do that. So the NEED for a wheelchair ramp is a special need.
     

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