Taliban stone couple to death for adultery in Afghanistan

Discussion in 'Ethics, Morality, & Justice' started by cosmictraveler, Aug 19, 2010.

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  1. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    KABUL, Afghanistan - Taliban militants in northern Afghanistan stoned a young couple to death for adultery, which a rights group said was the first confirmed use of the punishment here since the hardline Islamist regime was ousted in 2001.

    http://www.bing.com/search?q=taliban stone couple&form=msnpop
     
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  3. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    Americans spent billions arming and funding these guys back in the 1980s, now they are spending trillions fighting them. I guess it must be good for the economy - it certainly hasn't done the Afghans much good

    Once Upon a Time in Afghanistan...


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    A half-century ago, Afghan women pursued careers in medicine; men and women mingled casually at movie theaters and university campuses in Kabul; factories in the suburbs churned out textiles and other goods. There was a tradition of law and order, and a government capable of undertaking large national infrastructure projects, like building hydropower stations and roads, albeit with outside help. Ordinary people had a sense of hope, a belief that education could open opportunities for all, a conviction that a bright future lay ahead. All that has been destroyed by three decades of war, but it was real.

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    Original caption: "Kabul University students changing classes. Enrollment has doubled in last four years."

    The physical campus of Kabul University, pictured here, does not look very different today. But the people do. In the 1950s and '60s, students wore Western-style clothing; young men and women interacted relatively freely. Today, women cover their heads and much of their bodies, even in Kabul. A half-century later, men and women inhabit much more separate worlds.


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    "Biology class, Kabul University."

    In the 1950s and '60s, women were able to pursue professional careers in fields such as medicine. Today, schools that educate women are a target for violence, even more so than five or six years ago.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2010
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  5. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    Once Upon a Time in Afghanistan... (contd)


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    "Student nurses at Maternity Hospital, Kabul."

    When I was growing up, education was valued and viewed as the great equalizer. If you went to school and achieved good grades, you'd have the chance to enter college, maybe study abroad, be part of the middle class, and enjoy a comfortable lifestyle. Education was a hallowed value. Today, I think people have become far more cynical. They do not see the link between education and a better life; they see instead that those who have accumulated wealth and power have not done so through legitimate means.

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    "Most hospitals give extensive post-natal care to young mothers."

    This infant ward in a Kabul hospital in the 1960s contrasts sharply with one I visited in 2004 in Mazar-e-Sharif. There I found two babies born prematurely sharing the same incubator. That hospital, like many in Afghanistan today, did not have enough equipment.


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    "A laboratory at the Vaccine Research Center."

    Above is a vaccine research center attached to a Kabul hospital in the 1960s. Today, medical care across the country is limited by several factors, including lack of electricity. Less than 20 percent of Afghans have access to electricity; many homes are lit by kerosene lamps, with only fans running to combat the heat.
     
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  7. S.A.M. uniquely dreadful Valued Senior Member

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    Once Upon a Time in Afghanistan... (contd)

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    "Infant ward at feeding time."

    In the 1960s, about half of Afghanistan's people had access to some level of medical care; now a much smaller percentage do. Today's hospitals are crowded, the facilities limited; nearly one in four babies born in Afghanistan today does not reach its fifth birthday.

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    "A villager welcomes visiting nurses to his compound."

    The central government of Afghanistan once oversaw various rural development programs, including one, pictured here, that sent nurses in jeeps to remote villages to inoculate residents from such diseases as cholera. Now, security concerns alone make such an effort nearly impossible. Government nurses, as well as U.N. and NGO medical workers, are regular targets for insurgent groups that merely want to create disorder and terror in society.


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    "Hundreds of Afghan youngsters take active part in Scout programs."

    Afghanistan once had Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts. In the 1950s and '60s, such programs were very similar to their counterparts in the United States, with students in elementary and middle schools learning about nature trails, camping, and public safety. But scouting troops disappeared entirely after the Soviet invasions in the late 1970s.



    I think its important for Americans to recognise what their foreign policy costs other people around the world. And for what? All these people had a future in the 1960s and 1970s. Where are their children and grandchildren now?

    More pictures at original link.
     
  8. nirakar ( i ^ i ) Registered Senior Member

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  9. Gustav Banned Banned

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    nirakar
    given that someone found this newsworthy enough to post it here in sci, would it be more appropriate in another subforum? for instance, em&j? religion? sci&soc?

    thoughts?
     
  10. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    What are you posting this for? I posted mine because of the way people are being treated for a crime that should only be delt with by either divorce or other "civil" ways. To stone both of the people to death because of what ONE person has done, to me, just doesn't make any sense at all.
     
  11. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

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    While I agree with what you are talking about in general I think that America is fighting those who never wanted to see Afghanistan ever get ahead. There are always going to those in any society that want to rule it their way and not for everyone else but for only their well being.
     
  12. Ripley Valued Senior Member

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    Ah, those dormant savage morals looking for cheap thrills…
     
  13. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

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    We never funded the Taliban, as they didn't exist at the time of the Afghanistan-Soviet war. As if funding was the cause of their ideology in the first place.
     
  14. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    Mod Hat - Closure

    Mod Hat — Closure

    This thread is closed for lack of any substantial issue.

    It is a long standard at Sciforums that topic posts should include some manner of contribution from the posting member. That is, a simple quote and link do not suffice. This is an anti-spam standard and, in truth, currently under review. Until some administrative instruction should indicate otherwise, I intend to maintain that standard in EM&J. And, as this thread was transferred to EM&J (from World Events) specifically—as far as I can tell—for that purpose, it is now closed.

    Update: I have been corrected on the reason for the transfer of this thread to EM&J. Specifically, it was transferred in agreement with a member proposition according to the nature of the issues raised. My apologies to my colleague; I should have inquired, instead of simply presuming.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2010
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