Surfer’s ear provide fossil evidence of an aquatic phase in Man’s early evolution

Discussion in 'The Cesspool' started by CEngelbrecht, Jun 5, 2018.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. CEngelbrecht Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    354
    Don't worry, nobody's expecting you to see for yourself. So you don't have to. In fact, you don't want to end up that heretic.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  2. Guest Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. CEngelbrecht Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    354
    You know what? Elaine Morgan lived to a high age of 92. The cardinals in the ivory towers had more than enough time to get their head out of their arse. She was eligible for the Darwin-Wallace Medal, while she was alive.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!



    The brutalization of one of our time's great thinkers is a travesty of Galilean proportions. We haven't moved a single step since Copernicus.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2018
  4. Guest Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. Bells Staff Member

    Messages:
    22,706
    Mod Note

    You have been warned repeatedly about posting this stuff in the science forums on this site. Repeatedly.

    And you still keep doing it.

    Your link fails to actually discuss surfer's ear and is more intent on looking at the gait of early hominids. Surfer's ear is a painful condition that can lead to hearing loss and other hearing and ear problems if left untreated. The bony growth's trap water in the ear canal, leading to an increased risk of infection, which can damage hearing. It is more commonly found in swimmers and surfers in colder regions and became more prevalent after the invention of bodysuits, which allowed surfers and swimmers to take to colder water. There is no benefit to surfer's ear. On the contrary, it is a detriment.

    Surfer's ear is a bony growth that requires surgical intervention to treat. That should be enough of a giant hint, but alas, it is not. And it is not just cold water, but cold water and cold wind can result in these bony growths.

    Your link provides no evidence that this is an evolutionary trait, nor does it provide any evidence that this is a throwback that settles the "aquatic ape theory". At all.

    Please stop posting this rubbish in the science subsection.


     
  6. Guest Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page