Study reveals new physics of how fluids flow in porous media

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by Plazma Inferno!, Aug 24, 2016.

  1. Plazma Inferno! Ding Ding Ding Ding Administrator

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    One of the most promising approaches to curbing the flow of human-made greenhouse gases into the atmosphere is to capture these gases at major sources, such as fossil-fuel-burning power plants, and then inject them into deep, water-saturated rocks where they can remain stably trapped for centuries or millennia.
    This is just one example of fluid-fluid displacement in a porous material, which also applies to a wide variety of natural and industrial processes — for example, when rainwater penetrates into soil by displacing air, or when oil recovery is enhanced by displacing the oil with injected water.
    Now, a new set of detailed lab experiments has provided fresh insight into the physics of this phenomenon, under an unprecedented range of conditions. These results should help researchers understand what happens when carbon dioxide flows through deep saltwater reservoirs, and could shed light on similar interactions such as those inside fuel cells being used to produce electricity without burning hydrocarbons.
    The new findings are being published this week in the journal PNAS.

    http://news.mit.edu/2016/physics-how-fluids-flow-porous-media-carbon-fuel-cell-0822
     

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