Static Energy?Electricity?

Discussion in 'Pseudoscience' started by KUMAR5, Aug 26, 2017.

  1. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

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    183
    Hello,
    Greetings!!

    I read about these aspects:

    I want to know:

    Can this type of energy stay in a specific material for long time and if can, will it anyway express information about materials used to create it? I mean, can static energy tell about materials or secure their properties, used to create it?

    Thanks.
     
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  3. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

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    Non-covalent interactions [3] are critical in maintaining the three-dimensional structure of large molecules, such as
    proteins and nucleic acids. In addition, they are also involved in many biological processes in which large molecules bind specifically but transiently to one another (see the properties section of the DNA page). These interactions also heavily influence drug design, crystallinity and design of materials, particularly for self-assembly, and, in general, the synthesis of many organic molecules.[1][4][
    Hydrogen bonding[edit]

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    A hydrogen bond (H-bond), is a specific type of interaction that involves dipole-dipole attraction between a partially positive hydrogen atom and a highly electronegative, partially negative oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, or fluorine atom (not covalently bound to said hydrogen atom). It is not a covalent bond, but instead is classified as a strong non-covalent interaction. It is responsible for why water is a liquid at room temperature and not a gas (given water's low molecular weight). Most commonly, the strength of hydrogen bonds lies between 0 - 4 kcal/mol, but can sometimes be as strong as 40 kcal/mol[1]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-covalent_interactions [/quote]

    Static or electrostatic energy/electricity is a part on Non-covalent interaction and many on energy based but still unclear healing systems may be based on this theory...so need to be explored.
     
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  5. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

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    Sorry, I am not getting any response in this forum. Is it wrong forum for it and should I change or also post in Physics.. forum. Pls guide.
     
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  7. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

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    I noted that this subject was also discussed previously in this forum. But most discuusions were out of topic. I shall not insist, but if want to discuss again with new understandings, pls continue. Tap water has high conductivity abut distilled water has quite low and that is because 100% pure water id difficult to get. Lesser conductive and insulating matterials should have high potential to hold charge for long time. Charge in any other type of material is secured any way and not allowed to discharge, should also stay for long time.
     
  8. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    I don't see how that could be possible.
     
  9. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    10,009
    Pure water has a low conductivity because there are very few ions to conduct electricity.
    True.
     
  10. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    deleted - error in edit function
     
  11. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Hydrogen bonding is very interesting, but it is not entirely ionic in nature. There is a relationship to the "lone pairs" on oxygen which is directional, which a bond due solely to ionic interaction would not be.

    But from your last sentence I have a horrible feeling all this is a preamble to another bogus argument for homeopathy. If that happens, this thread will go straight to pseudoscience of course.
     
  12. origin Trump is the best argument against a democracy. Valued Senior Member

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    10,009
    I agree, the 'healing system' comment sounded pretty weird.
     
  13. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Water will rapidly discharge any static build-up, even distilled water. Don't forget the amount of charge separation even at high voltages, is very small. So water will not, let us say, retain any "memory" of substances that were in it previously.

    OK?
     
  14. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

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    183
    Thanks. Repeating. I think, such energy can be stored as per Capicitor model, probably only model for electric storage. Dielectric is very important for it.
     
  15. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

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    183
    It is for exploring science. and for better understanding force/energy in non covalent bonds and its storage, may be by capacitor model. May it be for any.
     
  16. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    Water is readily ionised and will rapidly discharge any accumulated static charge it comes into contact with. So useless as a dielectric. If you want to store energy in a capacitor, you need a good insulator to act as dielectric.

    So why are you interested in water in this connection?
     
  17. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

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    183
    Btw, whether water is a non covalent bond? It is indicated in that link. I am not interested in water but is in static Electricity and it's storage. Suppose water is in a glass/Dielctiac bottle then static energy in water or any other liquid can be stored in glass bottle or in its glass acting as dielectric between water and air?
     
  18. Write4U Valued Senior Member

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    5,122
    I know very little on the subject, but have read that old iron smelters would make excellent large capacity electric storage models to store excess electric waste (loss) from powerlines, which are active 24 hr per day but at night only use a fraction of available energy which becomes lost, unless stored.
     
  19. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    6,637
    So why post a paragraph on the bonding in water, then?

    Glass makes a good dielectric. In fact the first ever capacitor was the Leyden Jar: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leyden_jar
     
  20. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

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    To understand static energy relation with water.
     
  21. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    What do you mean by "static energy"?

    And what do you mean by "relation" between it and water?
     
  22. KUMAR5 Registered Senior Member

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    183
    Static energy and static Electricity same. Rest I shall tell later.
     
  23. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    No, they're not. A (grounded) pool of water 100 feet in the air has a lot of static (potential) energy, but no static electricity.
     
    ajanta and Write4U like this.

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