Specific heat of fluids

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by Facial, Oct 25, 2007.

  1. Facial Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,217
    It is well known that covalent bonds, ionic, and metallic bonds are generally stronger than hydrogen bonds.

    Then, why is that two notable hydrogen-bonded substances, as in ammonia and water, have much higher specific heats than mercury? That is, one would expect that the mercury's metallic bonds would hold more energy at a given temperature than other substances.

    If degrees of freedom are involved, then why do multi-DOF systems such as covalently-bonded quartz crystals or salt crystals have specific heats less than water/ammonia?
     

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