SLAC’s LCLS X-ray laser, and Transparency:

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by paddoboy, Aug 30, 2016.

  1. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    A 'nonlinear' effect that seemingly turns materials transparent is seen for the first time in X-rays at SLAC's LCLS
    August 30, 2016

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    An illustration shows what happens in a typical experiment with SLAC’s LCLS X-ray laser, top, versus what happened in this study with an especially intense X-ray pulse. Normally the X-ray pulses -- which are shown coming in from the right -- scatter off electrons in a sample and produce a pattern in a detector. But when researchers cranked up the intensity of the X-ray pulses, the pulses seemed to go straight through the sample, as if it were not there, and the pattern in the detector vanished. Two recent papers describe and explain this surprising result, which is due to a ‘nonlinear’ effect where particles of X-ray light team up to cause unexpected things to happen. Credit: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Imagine getting a medical X-ray that comes out blank – as if your bones had vanished. That's what happened when scientists cranked up the intensity of the world's first X-ray laser, at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, to get a better look at a sample they were studying: The X-rays seemed to go right through it as if it were not there.



    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-08-nonlinear-effect-seemingly-materials-transparent.html#jCp
     
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  3. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.027401


    Elimination of X-Ray Diffraction through Stimulated X-Ray Transmission


    ABSTRACT
    X-ray diffractive imaging with laterally coherent x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses is increasingly utilized to obtain ultrafast snapshots of matter. Here we report the amazing disappearance of single-shot charge and magnetic diffraction patterns recorded with resonantly tuned, narrow bandwidth XFEL pulses. Our experimental results reveal the exquisite sensitivity of single-shot charge and magnetic diffraction patterns of a magnetic film to the onset of field-induced stimulated elastic x-ray forward scattering. The loss in diffraction contrast, measured over 3 orders of magnitude in intensity, is in remarkable quantitative agreement with a recent theory that is extended to include diffraction.

     
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