Sedimentary Means Water Deposited

Discussion in 'Earth Science' started by IceAgeCivilizations, Mar 24, 2007.

  1. NDS NDS Registered Senior Member

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    Wow, lol. Did you miss my last post???

    I said:

    "Why should there be many river valleys, when the excerpt I gave you spoke of the ocean periodically submerging the land in water and creating a "pancake" effect of sediments?"

    The ocean submerging the land when the median sea level rose due to the polar ice caps melting and then the ocean recessing off it when the ice caps froze again. I thought it was pretty straightforward.

    Bones and teeth are not just inorganic minerals, but contain a significant amount of organic matter. This matter either decays or is replaced by mineralssuch as silica, calcite, or ion, or forms complex compounds by combining with these minerals. The replacement or combining takes place on a microscopic scale, so that tiny spaces around the inorganic matrix of the bone are filled with the new minerals. The resulting mineralized bone is thus a combination of the orginal inorganic bone matrix and the new minerals.

    Basically, fossils of dinos and other ancient creatures from millions of years ago are not actual bones, they are bones turned into mineralized rocks. Mineralization takes literally millions of years. Not one or two months.
     
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  3. Roman Banned Banned

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    You ever work with concrete?
     
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  5. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

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    How do the necessitated river valleys supposedly disappear by "pancake action?"

    Sounds like the geology version of "punctuated equilibrium."
     
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  7. NDS NDS Registered Senior Member

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    It's called the colorado river, for one. Is that not a valley?
     
  8. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

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    Where are the valleys left between the times of your supposed multiple trangressions of the sea onto the continents?
     
  9. NDS NDS Registered Senior Member

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    IAC, if you're theory was correct there wouldn't be hundreds of layers of sediment of alternating types. There would be ONE OR TWO GIANT LAYERS.
     
  10. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

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    Differing sedimentary regimes obviously would have resulted from such a catastrophe, with differing energies, sortings of grains, varying amounts of CaCO3 production, turbidites, etc.

    And the beds almost always grade into each other, indicating one transgression, not multiple.

    And when and how many ocean trangressions occurred according to your scheme, and where are the valleys from between the times of the supposed multiple transgressions?
     
  11. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

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    Why "two layers," if not one, NDS?
     
  12. NDS NDS Registered Senior Member

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    Limestone deposits are created when the ocean moves in and slates, shales and mudstone deposits are created when the ocean moves out and the area is covered by silts washing into the retreating ocean.
     
  13. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

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    Can we get a real geologist in here please.
     
  14. NDS NDS Registered Senior Member

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    Because clearly you aren't.
     
  15. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

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    Bachelor of Science (Earth Science) Dartmouth College, how 'bout you?
     
  16. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

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    At current erosion rates, all the continental rock above sea level should have eroded into the sea within 15 million years, but the mainstream geologists say some of the rocks are billions of years old, how could this be?
     
  17. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    I've often thought that colleges need a process for repossessing their certifications, under circumstances demonstrating that they were fraudulently obtained. But a college issuing a Bachelors in "Earth Science" maybe wouldn't care.

    Briefly: !) there are plenty of buried, filled in, geologically entombed former river valleys in the "geological column(s)". And there are plenty of river valleys that have lasted through several cycles of ocean rise and fall - the Mississippi, for example. River valleys outlast mountain ranges, on average.

    2) Erosion rates change all the time, for hundreds of reasons - projecting "current erosion rates" into the future is a mistake. And erosion often fails to match uplift, even - at "current erosion rates", Mt Everest will be a hundred miles high after a few eons.

    3) Wind and glacial forces account for almost all of the "geology" visible in some places.
    Yes, we can tell from the sorting, etc, a lot about the deposition environment of sediments subsequently made rock, and a lot about the time scale and forces under which that transformation happened. And we see none of the patterns of sedimentary rock regimes we would expect, from a single huge worldwide deluge and rapid transformation into rock.

    We see instead exactly what we would expect from the variety of deposition environments and long time scales required by the findings of ordinary - also known as competent, professional - geological science.
     
  18. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

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    What are these supposed geologically entombed river valleys?

    At current erosion rates, the continental rocks above sea level should have been eroded into the sea within 15 millions years.

    "Mount Everest will be a hundred miles high after a few eons," do tell, and will anything ever stop it? Ahahahaha.

    The surface of land is hardly the geologic column (referring to wind and glacial influence).

    So where are the future vast sedimentary layers up on the continents of tomorrow being formed today?
     
  19. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    ? Some of them are, for example, old river valleys that have been filled, uplifted, and incorporated into the bedrock of various geological formations. There is some mystery about that?
    That was excellent. Read the original of the qoute you have changed, and compare.
    Everywhere vast sedimentary layers are currently forming; such as the valleys and deltas of every major river system, the foothills of every major mountain range, the basins and shelves of the oceans, the bottoms of lakes, windshadows and dune formation, etc etc etc.

    Did you save any of your old college texts on geology? Inside them are chapters devoted to various aspects of deposition, erosion, continental drift, subduction and uplift, volcanism, etc etc etc.
     
  20. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

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    Cite some of the ancient river valleys which are supposedly now seen in the geologic column.

    The sedimentary column is mostly vast layers with billions of creatures entombed therein, and where is that happening again?
     
  21. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    Too lazy to crack those textbooks, then or now, or even Google? Dartmouth is slipping - - -

    Here's a couple places with quite a few of them:

    http://www.geosociety.org/news/pr/02-40.htm
    http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/open-file/of03-35/Badlands.txt
    http://www.earthview.pair.com/ctriver.html
     
  22. IceAgeCivilizations Banned Banned

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    Those are not descriptions of river valleys in the geologic column, those are descriptions of sedimentary rocks.
     
  23. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    Uh, genius, everything in the "geologic column" is rock, pretty much. River valley rock, ocean bottom rock, wind dune rock, peat bog rock, eutrophic lake rock, petrified wood rock, volcanic eruption rock, even some rock from deluges of one kind and another.

    You called it a "geologic column" for a reason, I hope?

    You wanted me to cite an example of this:
    and I did.

    Don't ever say I never did anything for you. When I refuse to do it ever again, I mean.

    Although this was almost worth it (I fixed your misquote)
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2007

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