Reflector VS Refractor

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by Tristan, Dec 7, 2001.

  1. ElectricFetus Sanity going, going, gone Valued Senior Member

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    ... What Xevious said, howeman.
     
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  3. howeman Registered Member

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    wellcooked, would you agree with xevious on his recommendation? Is that also upgradable? Is it a better version in the series? If so is there another I might want to look at?

    And finally after my onslaught of questions, what is the difference between an EQ1 and an EQ2 mount?
     
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  5. howeman Registered Member

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    Oh and one more thing (for now), in the product specifications, is light grasp the same thing as aperature?
     
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  7. ElectricFetus Sanity going, going, gone Valued Senior Member

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    Yes Xevious choose is very good, most likely worth the extra $30. Whats the diffrences between EQ-1 and EQ-2, how would I know, ask Orion. Yes both are upgradable read the links. The larger aperature size the more light grasphing.
     
  8. Xevious Truth Beyond Logic Registered Senior Member

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    THe key difference in the EQ-1 and the EQ-2 is not only the quality of the mount, but the accuracy. The EQ-1's setting circles, intended to show you the position of the telescope in R.A and Dec. (if it is polar-aligned well) aren't entirely accurate. They are good to within about a degree or so... good enough for a small telescope. The setting circles on the EQ-2 are accurate within a half-degree, possibly a quarter if you really have the tripod aligned well.

    The EQ-2 is designed to support more weight than the EQ-1 is as well. That 5.1" Spaceprobe 130 would fit on my EQ-1, but it would be far harder to use, as the mount couldn't compensate entirely for it's weight and would be far more likely to wobble, creating vibrations and thus making observing a difficult if not displeasing venture.

    The Spaceprobe 130 is the big brother of the telescope I so enjoy. However, the next largest telescope is the Astroview 6", which is $369 - over $100 more, with a difference of only 7 inches in light grasp. However, you are getting a FAR nicer telescope, which has probably one of the best Tripods Orion puts out, and can be upgraded indeed. The Spaceprobe 130 is FAR simpler to set up and use than the Astroview 6" however, a very important thing to take into account if you are just starting out.

    The Spaceprobe 130 is a rather popular choice amoung knowledgeable beginners. It isn't unusual for Orion to announce the scope has gone on backorder.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2003
  9. howeman Registered Member

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    Okay, thanks for all your help. One other question I have is how hard is it to move the spaceprobe around? Its 10lbs heavier and alot longer.

    Oh, and I saw the scope on sale somewhere else (I think it was the same scope) for cheaper. Would you reccomend buying from Orion to guarentee product quality and services etc?
     
  10. Xevious Truth Beyond Logic Registered Senior Member

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    I suggest that anyone buying their first scope do so from a reputed company like Orion, both for the warranty info, and for the service.

    The Spaceprobe 130 seems heavy, until you realize that it disassembles

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    Usually, when I go observing, I put the tripod down first, and then mount the telescope... and then do all my allignments. So long as you don't abuse this telescope and bang it around too much when you move it, it ought to last a lifetime. Love your telescope, and it will love you.
     
  11. howeman Registered Member

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    I was looking at some other telescopes yesterday, and one of the 8" dobs was $800! Do most dobs cost that much, or was that just a really expensive series I was looking at. And so you would recommend the praceprobe?
     
  12. ElectricFetus Sanity going, going, gone Valued Senior Member

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    I would not, I have a 8" spaceprobe (got it for $500 about 5-6 years ago) sure you can even make out the Orion nebula with this but the sky is always moving and you have to constantly adjust the scope, which is a pain because it very difficult to make small movements. I could never get a good camera image unless I was taking a shout of the moon. I have tried out equatorial mounts (at a local astronomy party (yes geek fest)) and I was blown way. With an equatorial mount you just align it up, aim at the celestial body you want and look at it, as the sky moves just twist the dial and you stay totally on track. Clear vibrationless images.
     
  13. Xevious Truth Beyond Logic Registered Senior Member

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    It depends on the Dobsonian... some Dobs as wellcooked says, are horrible! But some, like the Orions and those made by Discovery, are quite good. The chatch is: Astrophotography will be very hard to do.

    For casual use, I am still a fan of the tried and true Alt-Azmuth system - and Dobsonians are Alt-Azmuth. Sure tracking isn't as easy especially at high magnifications, but for wide-field deep sky images, Dobsonians are a NICE option. It is another one of those questions that boils down to what you want to do. For just looking around, Dobsonians are OK. If you want to do some serious work, only an Equatorial will do.
     

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