Quantum teleportation

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by razz, Dec 25, 2001.

  1. razz Registered Senior Member

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    224
    I read this in a post about Teleportation...

    In the December 11 1997 issue of Nature, Anton Zeilinger and colleagues at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, demonstrated their ability to destroy and recreate bits of light. Utilizing Quantum Teleportation, and idea that even Einstein
    thought was impossible, destroyed massless photons, and in the process transferring information about a physical characteristic of the photons. Other photons picked
    up this information and took on the characteristic, thus becoming replicas of the original bits of light.

    does anyone have a link or a way i can varify or read further about these tests?

    cheers
     
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  3. Dreamsa Dare to Dream! Registered Senior Member

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    Hi!

    I also want to know this.

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    Some people just say this is a wild fantasy.

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    Any good links?

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  5. Chagur .Seeker. Registered Senior Member

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    razz, Dreamsa ...

    Might want to look at this:

    <a href=http://www.nature.com/nature/fow/010125.html><font color=red>"Freezing Light"</font></a>

    But the light experiments have nothing to do with quantum 'Teleportation'

    Take care
     
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  7. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    Quantum teleportation is a real phenomenon. I suggest that a search of the web for Zeilinger would give you a few links.
     
  8. Chagur .Seeker. Registered Senior Member

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    James R, razz ...

    If this is the phenomina that was referred to in the April '01 issue of the Scientific American:

    <a href=http://www.sciam.com/explorations/122297teleport/test.html><font color=red>The Innsbruck Experiment</font></a>

    All I can say is that it made me decided not to renew my subscription. It's one thing to modernize the look of the magazine, but to 'hype' an article with a catchy title is beyond what I had come to expect of S.A.

    As far is I can see, what is indicated is an information/data transfer, not 'teleportation' as is commonly understood.
     
  9. Chagur .Seeker. Registered Senior Member

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    James R, razz ...

    If this is the phenomina that was referred to in the April '01 issue of the Scientific American:

    <a href=http://www.sciam.com/explorations/122297teleport/index.html><font color=red>Beam Me Up Scotty</font></a>

    and

    <a href=http://www.sciam.com/explorations/122297teleport/test.html><font color=red>The Innsbruck Experiment</font></a>

    All I can say is that it made me decided not to renew my subscription. It's one thing to modernize, but to 'hype' and article with a catchy title is beyond what I had come to expect from S.A.

    As far is I can see, what is indicated is an information/data transfer not 'teleportation' as is commonly understood.
     
  10. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    Chagur,

    That article refers to the correct phenomenon.

    I think that the label "teleportation" is justified here. There is a theorem in quantum mechanics called the <i>no cloning theorem</i>, which states that it is impossible to completely copy a quantum state. The reason for this is that to copy a state you need to measure it somehow in order to know what it is. But any quantum measurement of a state causes the state to collapse to an eigenstate, thus modifying the state you're trying to copy and losing information. Every measurement necessarily only gives partial information about what the state was before the measurement, and once the measurement is made you can't go back and get more information.

    In constrast, in the teleportation experiments a complete quantum state is transferred from one photon to another. The original state is necessarily destroyed in the process, but the transferred information contains <i>all</i> (not just part) of the information about the original state. It is fair to say that the state has been teleported from one particle to another (which is not the same as copying).
     
  11. Chagur .Seeker. Registered Senior Member

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    Sorry all ...

    Don't know how the second post occurred during an 'edit' but what's worse, I can't delete either one.
     
  12. Chagur .Seeker. Registered Senior Member

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    2,235
    Okay ...

    Looks like I don't have to get off a buzz to Porfiry re. a problem: Our posts got entangled!!

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    But more seriously; I can understand where you're coming from but I'm still uncomfortable calling it 'teleportation'. In the brief Cal.Tech. article I'm linking you to there seems to be a need to refer to the 'communication' aspect in addition to the 'teleportation' and I'm wondering why it isn't simply referred to as 'quantum communication'.

    Is it the 'disappearance' of 'Alice' that makes it different?

    <a href=http://www.cco.caltech.edu/~qoptics/teleport.html><font color=red>Quantum Optics Group</font></a>

    Take care.

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    Last edited: Dec 26, 2001

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