Pyramids Built Inside Out?

Discussion in 'Architecture & Engineering' started by Prince_James, Mar 31, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Walter L. Wagner Cosmic Truth Seeker Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,525
    Ophiolite:

    It is interesting that there are three granite plugs that were placed in the ascending passage. Are they from the same quarry as the granite of the "King's Chamber". Those were undoubtedly some of the most difficult blocks to move.

    To me, the whole Great Pyramid was built with great symbolism in mind. Why place granite plugs in the ascending passage, anyway, since there was nothing further beyond, in either the "King's Chamber" or "Queens Chamber", other than the empty granite sarcophagus, according to al Mamoun's account. They were placed in the ascending passage during the course of construction, and could not have been slid into place.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2007
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. Ophiolite Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,232
    Two points:
    (1) Although it is difficult to see how anyone could have got in ahead of al Mamoun, this is not ruled out. The pyramid could have been robbed at an earlie date.
    (2) As I recall the ascending passage was designed for around fifteen blocks. Why were only three used? That would tend to confirm that the Pyramid was never used as a burial device.

    It also occurs to me that al Mamoun may have concelaed what was actually discovered, though I can't offer a motive, or evidence to support this, other than 'that's what people sometimes do'. Carter's sneek look into Tutankamen's tomb is such an example.
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. Walter L. Wagner Cosmic Truth Seeker Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,525
    Ophiolite:

    I have read anecdotal reports that prior to circa 500 B.C., the original entrance was covered by a hinged block of limestone that could be opened and closed, allowing for 'priests' and others to enter. Likewise,the ascending passage was reportedly covered with a hinged block of limestone. We do know the limestone block that covered the ascending passage broke free during Al Mamoun's digging days. We also know the granite plugs were in situ at that time. We also know that the covering over the real entrance was sufficiently concealing that Al Mamoun could not discover it, and started chiseling a tunnel entrance somewhat lower.

    With all of that, it appears that Al Mamoun was the first person to enter into the ascending passages, since they were closed. However, the "well-shaft" connects the descending and ascending passages. One wonders what the purpose of that was for, and whether it too might have allowed for entry into the Grand Gallery region, bypassing the ascending passage. How was it concealed, since it connects to the descending passage?

    Perhaps you have a little more insight, since you've apparently actually visited the GP a few times, and I've only read about it, and its hidden mathematics. Any insight would be appreciated.
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. Ophiolite Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,232
    Walter, I lived in Cairo for four years in the early nineteen eighties. Since visiting company wheels always wanted to visit the pyramids I found myself acting as their guide, hence my compartively numerous visits, to Cheops in particular. Naturally I also read up on them in some depth at that time. Now, since that was over twenty years ago, I have forgotten most of what I knew and read, though I retain an interest in the subject.
    I do find it strange that whereas several other pyramids clearly did serve as burial edifices, Cheops was, apparently, empty. It seems more logical to believe that it was robbed at some point, perhaps within weeks or months of the burial, by those in the know, than to beleive that such a great structure was created as a pure symbol. That said, you mention the hidden mathematics. I guess you are thinking of the works of Smythe and the Italian mathematician whose name escapes me. [Let's not mention Graham Hancock, or poor old SkinWalker will have a fit.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    ] There are certainly some fascinating interpretations possible there.
    I just don't know. I do know the pyramids at Giza, and the other ones further up the Nile, are damnably impressive. Whatever their purpose, or detailed history they deserved their reputation as one of the Wonders of the World.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page