Powers of the Mind?

Discussion in 'Human Science' started by Time/02112, Sep 11, 2001.

  1. Time/02112 Senior Member Registered Senior Member

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    <IMG SRC=http://iasos.com/detalist/rol/FractalSquare.gif>
    Just think what we could do if we as humans simply alowed ourselves to be released from our inhibitions to evolve our minds?

    PK Fire-Brain Man, A True "Force of One!"


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  3. spankyface Registered Senior Member

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    Last night I had a dream that I moved a cellphone with my mind.

    First me and my friends were sitting around concentrating, and with the emotional numbness of recent events my mind was extremely active. We moved a cup an inch off the table and I told them I think I had it.
    I concentrated and put the cellphone prompted to dial someone either from another world or that I knew didn't fit in physically with this world and all I focused on was the phone, completely blocking anything else out of my mind. It was like I communicated with another side of reality to it to move... it was a very strange dream.
    I wonder how humans could evolve the minds? We have to come up with entirely new concepts either at formative ages or plant them directly.
    It would be amazing if we could somehow, without damaging a person's mind, block off a certain part of their mind, forcing them to develop other areas of the brain to function. Or if we could transmit a wavelength that stimulated neural activity to travel in random patterns, thereby increasing any chance encounter with a mystic part of the brain.
     
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  5. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    Spanky,
    From what research I've been doing "hunting down information" I have found that there have been experiments in the field of Frequency stimulation of the mind, and they have been going for quite some time.

    Of course the main problem is that these experiment have been known to occur on the "unsuspecting public" without their "Prior consent". Of course the problem here is that in itself would be a complaint, but they haven't just done these experiments without telling their glorified labrat, but they also have been known to make these people slightly unstable and pushed them into psychiatric care just to debunct the information they have to offer.

    It's known that it's easy for them to debunct the information by using a persons very own imagination to fill in the gaps, namely they supply some form of illusion and the mind tries to conjure some reality around it to make it understandible.

    This means that Doctors all over the world calling people Manic Obsessive and similar, are actually doing so because they don't realise that that person was a preportion of some study.

    I know those Psychiatric doctors are going to have to wake up to these "Real" experiments or they will continue to inaccurately perscribe medicine etc.

    More information can be found at http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~welsh/book.htm

    There is a mention in the document that I cross referenced with some information I previously knew from another source.
    The human brains neural pathway runs with a frequency of about 100 stimuli per second along one neural pathway, it is known that using frequency the human brain can actually get near to 1.45 it's normal speed/capacity. (Namely 145 stimuli per Second) a Brain Overclock

    This can mean a few things,
    1. you become more intellegent through a better use of your brain, your reactions are quickened etc
    2. you could become quite silly, barmy.. mad even, through the shear fact that it will take you some time to get use to your brains new speed.
    3. Due to the external frequencies causing a mild form of radiation, you could be prone to certain genetic mutations.
      [/list=1]
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2001
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  7. bbcboy Recovering christian Registered Senior Member

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    In my experience losing inhibitions would be a good start to living this life for many people.
    Using their minds to better cope with their own reality would benefit mankind tenfold.
    Think about it no more jealousy, denial, hatred, or fear.

    I stress I'm talking about losing inhibitions and not self control. Is the stumbling block to eutopia our own lack of expression?
     
  8. Imahamster Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    135
    Spankyface, Imahamster has had similar dreams of levitating objects or self. Had one waking experience involving a 1/1,000,000,000 probability event occurring immediately after the prediction that it would happen. Categorized as “unknown” for now. The experience made Imahamster less skeptical that strange phenomena occur, though no less skeptical of the explanations given for those phenomena. (As Stryder points out “…the mind tries to conjure some reality around it to make it understandible.”)

    Imahamster has also wondered to what extent human constraints of biological brain and cultural conditioning limit perception/understanding of the universe.

    Easy to lose one’s path in exploring the strange, weird, and fascinating universe. Imahamster clings tightly to the lifeline of science. Over time science winnows flowers from weeds. (Sadly an occasional flower is cut down along with the weeds.) The garden seems to be flourishing. Fast as this hamster runs, he can’t collect all the tasty seeds the garden is producing.

    Stryder, altering nerve signaling with electromagnetic fields is interesting.

    Information in the visual system seems to be conveyed by changing pulse frequency. That is, the amplitude of the electrical pulses is the same but a more intense stimulus generates more pulses. The speed of the pulse is independent of the frequency. The myelin sheath surrounding a nerve bundle acts as an insulator that extends the distance the pulse may travel without being regenerated and influences pulse speed. The pulses are generated by a rapid local change in a nerve cell’s sodium and potassium concentration. After each pulse the ionic gradient must be restored by ionic pumps on the cell membrane. This chemical recharge rate limits how fast pulses may be sent.

    Electromagnetic fields applied to the spine are being tested for pain control. Presumably the EM field is disrupting pain signal transmission. (Interestingly, one woman found the transformed signals VERY pleasurable.)

    Imahamster would appreciate links to sites with info on brain over-clocking.
     
  9. whatsherface imaginary entity Registered Senior Member

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    Does anyone think maybe electromagnetic pollution is disrupting normal thought patterns, at least in susceptible people, perhaps contributing to increasing occurence of depression, ADD etc? Wasn't there some theory about homing pigeons' navigational ability for instance being put off by microwave pollution? Maybe it affects us more than we think, since we don't know how we think.
     
  10. kmguru Staff Member

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    11,757
    EMFs are bad for you. The best solution is to line your bedroom with thin metal sheets and paint over it. The best ones are galvanized sheet metal you can buy at Home Depot type place.

    On another front, I have a psychic friend who claims, she did move objects with her mind (paper on a needle on top of a candle covered with an empty glass) when she was 14, but can not do later on. One telltale sign is that the heartbeat goes up when that happens. I guess we loose the ability as we get older....
     
  11. Imahamster Registered Senior Member

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    The Hughes Satellite Division has a microwave antenna test site. A friend joked that you could map the beam path by following the trail of dead birds. (This was a joke.)

    Focused magnetic fields have been used to disrupt brain function in order to study brain function. They’ve also been used therapeutically as described in this article.

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/1998-01/NIoN-TMSE-290198.php

    As for power line emissions, electric blanket fields, or microwave pollution…who knows. The field intensities are too small for heat damage to matter. (Microwaves heat water.)

    There is conjecture that molecular structures may act as antennae and thereby greatly strengthen the effect of some weak fields. Supposedly the Soviets could disorient and cause some brain damage by beaming a highly focused combination of special microwave frequencies. Obviously this is not research from the peer-reviewed public sources that this hamster depends upon to separate fact from fiction.

    There are unlimited ways modern technology may be unknowingly affecting humans. Radiation, atmospheric or water pollution, diet, medicines, living in crowded cities, media, video games, etc. Various medical agencies continually perform statistically studies looking for correlations that could detect such problems.

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2002-01/ns-dea010902.php

    On balance this hamster feels the unknown dangers are likely small compared to known dangers that humans choose to ignore. (Smoking, car accidents, asteroid collision.)
     
  12. whatsherface imaginary entity Registered Senior Member

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    *winces* you trust peer review? that is notoriously unsatisfactory!
     
  13. Imahamster Registered Senior Member

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    In matters of science this hamster doesn’t “trust” easily or quickly. This hamster tries to avoid making premature conclusions one way or the other.

    There are many problems with peer view. The system tends to favor incumbent theories. Fringe theories may be totally ignored. Fame plays too strong a role. Politics, both personal and national, plays a strong role.

    With all its faults what’s the alternative to peer review?

    (It seems to this hamster that this discussion itself is peer review.)
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2002
  14. kmguru Staff Member

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    11,757
    I have a personal experience though not scientific, I will be careful. Several years ago, I bought an electronic air ionizer with 4 needles. I left it running on my bed side table. I liked the ozonized effect in the air (what you smell during thunderstorms). Well about siz months later, I developed small pimple like structures on the side of my face close to the ionizer. I got scared and used a keratolytic process to remove them. I also stopped the ionizer. Never had any skin problems since then. Co-incidence, may be.

    I read that hiway patrol people who keep their radar guns in the groin area get testicular cancer which is rare in general population. I head that one operator working in a high energy magnetic laboraty died at 38 from cancer.

    So, better be safe than sorry. Low level DC magnets may not have much effect in short time exposure, but AC fields are un-natural and constant changes in polarisation/induction can cause havoc in the body such as waterbed heaters under your head (put it at the leg end).
     
  15. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    13,101
    You mentioned of Radar guns, that made me think of how it is possible to falsify the readings that they give out if a car is bombarded by dopplers, or even just an EM pulsation.

    The Em pulsation is especially noticable as it "Buffers" the radars own dopplers, speeding them up.
    At the current increase of moble phone masts and emitters I would say that any speeding ticket from a Radar and Camera should just be thrown in the bin.
     
  16. whatsherface imaginary entity Registered Senior Member

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  17. kmguru Staff Member

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    11,757
    How does peer review work if the chinese cook starts cooking mexican food?
     
  18. Imahamster Registered Senior Member

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    Interesting thought Kmguru. Perhaps by focusing on the taste and quality of the food instead of the cook. If cooks faced scientific peer review then presumably their recipes would be open for examination and test.

    Reputation does play a role. While success in cooking Chinese food doesn’t guarantee a chef’s producing a tasty Mexican food dish, this hamster would be willing to taste a favored chef’s ventures into new cuisine at least once. Might not bother twice.

    In an ideal world the fame of a chef would not influence the review. Fortunately in this non-ideal world there is usually some young Turk chef willing to challenge the old master.

    And what if the chef explored totally new territory? Hamster cuisine? Might have to start a new cooking school and recruit new students and customers and backers. Not easy. Tough to be a new idea in an old idea world.
     
  19. Imahamster Registered Senior Member

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    Stryder, a friend who is an expert in radar successfully defended himself against a radar speed ticket in a California court. He came prepared with charts and articles to contest the charge. He was disappointed when the judge took a quick glance and then ruled the case dismissed.
     
  20. Imahamster Registered Senior Member

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    Whatsherface, thanks for the interesting seeds. This hamster liked that your links included suggestions for improving peer review. Enjoy seeing science improve itself.

    This hamster should clarify that by “peer review” this hamster includes publishing a book, putting up a web site, posting on a public forum, or any medium in which the evidence, methodology, and conclusions may be presented and then critically discussed. Imagine evaluating a person’s statement that they have a friend in the NSA who is privy to information that the US has a base on the far side of the moon and that’s why there have been no more moon missions. Uh huh.

    This hamster especially liked reading the following:

    “Electronic publishing can allow peer review to be open not only to authors but also to readers. Most readers don't care much about peer review and simply want some assurance that papers published are valid, but some readers, particularly researchers, will want to follow the scientific debate that goes on in the peer review process. It could also have great educational value. With electronic publishing we may put shorter, crisper versions in the paper edition of the journal and longer, more scientific versions on our website backed up by a structured account of the peer review process.”

    Yum, yum, more tasty seeds for this hamster.
     
  21. Yogamojo Here's lookin' at you...? Registered Senior Member

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    One impressive hamster...

    You should have some of your Hamsterian peers submit collectively their ides to our congress. Our country could possibly supercede the tumultuous economic mire that awaits our majority unless this path is derailed if only light were shed in time.

    I can only report, I cannot act, long ago was my body taken from me.

    ¿Shouldn't "hamster" be capitalized?

    Or even"Imahamster"?

    Namaste.....
     
  22. Imahamster Registered Senior Member

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    Yogamojo, thank you. Would you believe this hamster was the runt of the litter.

    “I can only report, I cannot act, long ago was my body taken from me.”

    That sounds sad. A good run on a wheel usually helps but…with no body?

    “¿Shouldn't "hamster" be capitalized?”

    YES! Send money! NOW! Oh, not what you meant. Darn.

    Ana’s “Hulk Hamster” showed respect and was excellent. “Hamsterian” has a nice thespian flavor. People easily forget hamster names. One first referred to this hamster as “Imahamsteer”. Then “Imahamcow. And finally as “Imahampig”. Though unintentional the last was a serious breach of etiquette as this hamster is NOT a Guinea pig. Avoid the “pig” thing and there won’t be a problem.
     
  23. Yogamojo Here's lookin' at you...? Registered Senior Member

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    Not so sad really...

    Imahamster,

    Eye only meant, friend Hamster, that on SciForums I am only a digital entity, just as you are a digital hamster here (I'm not really dead yet). But as such I am quite happy! Please do not mourn my noncorporeality; there are actually certain freedoms it allows...

    It is true that misnomers can sting, And forbid someone from ever referring to you as a mere "Ima-gerbil"...That would be like calling me just "Yoga", or just "Mojo"(...ouch...) I need them both. Though with the power of the mind I could eventually transcend this pain much in the same manner that yogis and contortionists overcome the natural physical limits of the body, gaining control over involuntary functions, flexibility, even the amount of oxygen they require; and this is no anomaly as films and freakshows can prove.

    This makes me wonder how far it goes. ¿If one can harness these feats which seem impossible to a majority, then what other natural rules can be bent or defeated by the mind?

    Any thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2002

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