Plastic pollution

Discussion in 'Human Science' started by Bebelina, Nov 23, 2018.

?

Do you sort your garbage? (plastic in particular)

  1. Yes

    6 vote(s)
    75.0%
  2. No

    1 vote(s)
    12.5%
  3. Sometimes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. When there are available sorting containers

    1 vote(s)
    12.5%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,137
    Don't tell me you are using a.....c..c.c.car

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    to do your shopping, Bebelina!

    By the way, I got a reply back from the mail order company, within 2 working days, which is pretty good, as follows:

    "Many thanks for your email!

    Unfortunately at the moment the safest way to get acrylic boxes and display cases to our customers is to use bubble wrap. These are the only product that we package this way, all of our others are packaged using recyclable items. Also, all of the acrylic scrap that we acquire goes for recycling.

    Thank you for your comments and feedback. We will keep you up to date when we make more updates and changes in regards to this."

    So that's fair enough I suppose. My fault, perhaps, for ordering an acrylic display case, for putting on show my father's lead toy soldiers from the 1930s, which he collected as a child.
     
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  3. Bebelina kospla.com Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,036
    Bells, I like the Australian spirit, to look at possible solutions instead of being overburdened by the problems. There are new biodegradable 'plastics' in development, the already establsihed plastic industries are however slow in adapting new materials and technologies as they have invested much in the 'old ways'. I think following exchemist initiative and start complaining more will eventually lead to a change.
     
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  5. Bebelina kospla.com Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,036
    Good job! Aside from the acrylic purchase. Those toy soldiers would probably have looked even better in a glass cabinet.

    I go by foot.

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    Carrying those heavy bags is good work out. ...and I haven't gotten a drivers license yet, but have signed up now and am going to get it! Will pcrobably be the oldest person at the driving school.
     
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  7. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,137
    You should get another bike. Much better for you. And the Dutch make some really big panniers for the shopping bags. We got into the habit when we lived in The Hague for a few years and kept it up on our return to London. I find the bike is just as quick as the car, without the cost and hassle of parking it - and I often see people to speak to, or at least wave to, as I cycle.

    Agree about the glass cabinet, but glass you know is quite bad for the environment too. It takes a lot of energy to make glass objects. And I couldn't find a glass one on-line.
     
  8. iceaura Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    28,928
    After years in a city without a car ending in coerced purchase for work, I found the loss of freedom inherent in dealing with the hassles of the damn thing, compared with a bicycle, almost startling. Car owners get used to it, apparently, or maybe never knew any different.
     
  9. Bowser Right Here, Right Now Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,368
    Been commuting to work on the train these past several months. I walk maybe 20 blocks everyday to and from the train stop. I kind of like it.
     
  10. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,137
    I have always kept a car, but only use it for visiting my old dad in his nursing home and for our occasional trips to France, to see my deceased wife's relatives and to stay at their place in Brittany where my son goes sailing. I do about 3,000 miles a year.

    In fact, that presents an environmental dilemma. I'll need to change it in a few years and was thinking of a hybrid (pure electric not so good for long trips to France). However I have been warned that hybrid batteries do not work very well under occasional use. Seems they need a regular charge/discharge cycle to keep in shape, or something. So great for minicab drivers and regular commuters, but not for people like me. I'd be interested in any comments about this from people with experience of the issue.
     
  11. Benson Registered Member

    Messages:
    63
    I'm in my 50's but I remember pop and milk sold in glass bottles that were washed out and reused. Although supermarkets were growing with foods becoming more and more in plastic, many ingredients were sold in paper and cardboard, even meat on greased proof paper. The human race existed before plastics, from 2030, all plastic connected to food should be banned. If it means buying ingredients and using the kitchen again, so be it.

    Pollution and chemicals in food are the triggers to cancer.
     
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  12. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,137
    People, animals and plants all suffered from cancer long before the advent of artificial chemicals in food and pollution.
     
  13. Benson Registered Member

    Messages:
    63
    Yes. Also, people used to get run over on the roads by carts. With the advent of the car, it has increased.
     
  14. exchemist Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,137
    Questionable. Victorian roads were pretty crowed and dangerous, and safety culture almost non-existent. Do you have data to support your view?

    As for cancer, what evidence do you have that the incidence of cancer in modern society is higher, correcting for the longer age to which we all now live, than in earlier times? A lot of the current prevalence of cancer is due to the fact we live long enough now to get it, whereas before we died sooner, of other things.
     
  15. billvon Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    15,767
    Agreed. Fortunately in most places that is getting better.
     
  16. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    699
    Is plastic pollution bad for coral reefs?
     
  17. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    699
    As we do more research into what chemicals are bad for us and the environment and develop ways to keep them out of our bodies and out of the environment then our food, water, and air supply will hopefully become cleaner and safer for us all to use.
     
  18. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,992
    i recently decided to start seriously thinking about this.
    i have not yet started seriously thinking about it though.

    personally i like to think i am helping the planet & nature and the nice people by sorting all my garbage.
    i sort, wash, recycle re-use as much as possible.

    my big focus is on avoiding contributing to methane rubbish dump gas production and making recycling easier for the companies by sorting and cleaning(mostly)
     
  19. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,992
    don't know precisely.
    someone might
    most recent closest is the used tires that were used to create an artificial reef
    the oil has leeched out and is killing things and polluting fish stocks.
    they are currently fund raising to remove the used car tires.

    if plastic leeches, then inevitably it will damage via chemicals.
     
  20. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    699
    I believe coral reef help filter the water but some chemicals and substances can harm or even kill them in large enough quantities.
     
  21. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,992
    Coral is a filter feeder.
    if you dont know what that is then you need to do some study.
    your question is exactly the same as a 10 year old child asking
    "do car crashes hurt?"

    the question is not advanced enough to make any logical scientific sense with an answer.

    Coral do not filter the reef as a protection process.
    Coral filter feed.

    the semi sane question which is the ignorant transference issue from mammals dying from eating plastic and plastic being in human food sources via eating sea-food...
    is
    will coral starve to death by ingesting plastic that is not digestible and then die off ?

    your question is irrelevant because the primary killers of coral are 4 things

    1 phosphate run off causing algae blooms from over use on farms.
    2 sea temperature and coral bleaching by sun light and sea level change and sea temperature rise.
    3 crown of thorns star fish eating the coral in plague proportions
    4 change in coral spawning ability and damage to that process.

    coral starving to death from ingesting plastic particles is way down the list and is only a marketing ploy by big binsess to create false scientific data to promote them making profit by selling new items to consumers while cutting customer service.
     
  22. mmatt9876 Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    699
    So plastic pollution is harmful to coral reefs because plastic particle ingestion leads to starvation in coral reefs?
     
  23. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,992
    ...
     

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