"phyletic gradualism"?

Discussion in 'Biology & Genetics' started by Buckaroo Banzai, Nov 16, 2004.

  1. Buckaroo Banzai Mentat Registered Senior Member

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    Does "phyletic gradualism" really exists, as it is commonly exposed on explanation of what punctuated equilibria, a pattern of macroevolution with nearly constant rates of morphological change? Who defends or defended it, and why?

    Other thing. Isn't unusual to see people saying about PE as it if was something oposed to the new synthesis or selectionism, and even to gradualism (which seems to be, this last case, a confusion between gradualism and "phyletic gradualism"). Is that right? To me seems that the basic EP pattern can be achieved through the populational events, bottleneck effect and etc, wich make them compatible. But EP is only that? I've read people saying that Gould used to say that a newer synthesis will come someday and will explain everything better, which suggests some incompatibility.... what it would be?
     
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  3. CharonZ Registered Senior Member

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  5. Buckaroo Banzai Mentat Registered Senior Member

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    "Skin alterations in collagenoses (author's transl)]

    [Article in German]

    Storck H."


    ...it is really that what you suggested?
     
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  7. CharonZ Registered Senior Member

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    Whoops. Must have done something wrong with the link:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/...ve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15241603

    Guess I truncated it somehow.
    Here is the abstract:

    In 1858, two naturalists, Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace, independently proposed natural selection as the basic mechanism responsible for the origin of new phenotypic variants and, ultimately, new species. A large body of evidence for this hypothesis was published in Darwin's Origin of Species one year later, the appearance of which provoked other leading scientists like August Weismann to adopt and amplify Darwin's perspective. Weismann's neo-Darwinian theory of evolution was further elaborated, most notably in a series of books by Theodosius Dobzhansky, Ernst Mayr, Julian Huxley and others. In this article we first summarize the history of life on Earth and provide recent evidence demonstrating that Darwin's dilemma (the apparent missing Precambrian record of life) has been resolved. Next, the historical development and structure of the "modern synthesis" is described within the context of the following topics: paleobiology and rates of evolution, mass extinctions and species selection, macroevolution and punctuated equilibrium, sexual reproduction and recombination, sexual selection and altruism, endosymbiosis and eukaryotic cell evolution, evolutionary developmental biology, phenotypic plasticity, epigenetic inheritance and molecular evolution, experimental bacterial evolution, and computer simulations (in silico evolution of digital organisms). In addition, we discuss the expansion of the modern synthesis, embracing all branches of scientific disciplines. It is concluded that the basic tenets of the synthetic theory have survived, but in modified form. These sub-theories require continued elaboration, particularly in light of molecular biology, to answer open-ended questions concerning the mechanisms of evolution in all five kingdoms of life.
     
  8. Buckaroo Banzai Mentat Registered Senior Member

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    Thanks, I got the article

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