Pet Raccoon?

Discussion in 'Free Thoughts' started by LiteFeather09, Nov 11, 2019.

  1. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,041
    Sorry for messed up post

    I'm in Bali and here they post ads over everything and it screws with the download

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  2. Guest Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,864
    The Chernobyl jackalope is spreading quickly.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
    RainbowSingularity likes this.
  4. Guest Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,041
    Still only taste like chicken

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
    Gawdzilla Sama likes this.
  6. Guest Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,246
    When I lived in Africa we had 3 chameleon lizards that lived in our house. They took care of most of the scorpions and other entertaining arthropods that relentlessly found a way in.

    My father kept a raccoon as a pet when he was a young man. Over the years he had more animals than one could believe as pets. A 16 foot long Vietnamese rainbow rock python, lion fish, scorpions, caimans, iguanas, turtles, monitor lizards etc. Living in the same house as those as I grew up was....unique.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!



    I have always had a dog, love hanging with a dog. Still do, 1 dog - my lovely lady Labrador. I value quality over other things, dogs - like children - will give you back what you invest in them.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
    LiteFeather09 likes this.
  8. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,864
    When I lived in Puerto Rico I shared a house with three other GIs. For pets we had sand crabs and stewardesses.
     
  9. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,232
    Religious dictatorship of socialism ruled by capitalism
    lol
     
  10. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,232
    those teeth confuse me
    they appear to be holding teeth rather than puncturing teeth
    i am guessing its main diet is deer and bring them down by sheer weight of numbers
    like a swarm of flying vampire piranhas

    speaking near crypto-zoological proportions
    we have a local pheasant that stands almost 2 feet tall
    larger than most peoples dogs
    thankfully it's vegetarian
     
  11. Beer w/Straw Transcendental Ignorance! Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,827
    Unusual pets...

    I think a pet like this would say something about the owner...

    (Just felt like posting the video.)

     
    RainbowSingularity likes this.
  12. Michael 345 New year. PRESENT is 71 years old Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,041
    Hope the two not linked in a medical fashion

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
    RainbowSingularity likes this.
  13. RainbowSingularity Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    5,232
    what'd ya say stoopid
    thanks for the treats stoopid
    honey badge doesnt give a shit

    best wildlife commentary ever !
    noah fence David
     
  14. LiteFeather09 Registered Member

    Messages:
    13
    Ended up doing a little reading and saw this article mentioning they're smart and mischievous but I had no idea they're easily bored. Although I suppose that explains the mischief/I'm gonna chew on everything destroy your house if I'm left alone thing.

    I did come across an account on instagram (they also have some youtube vids) of a pet raccoon, not sure if any of you are familiar but he's called Tito the Raccoon! Rescued two years ago...

    I definitely agree. Plus some of them tend to be pet fads? I guess rescued animals would be different though.
     
  15. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,864
    I had several options for that, but the one I went with just worked.
     
  16. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,799
    I definitely agree. [wild animals make poor pets]
    On what basis, if you've never had one?
    Actually, it kind of depends on how you define - and treat - pets.
    Our relations with other species are due for a serious review/overhaul.
    Humans are such shits - they'll use anything or anyone to make themselves look cool.
    Well, the animals are no different, but our attitude is.
    I've never had a companion animal that hadn't been injured or homeless.
     
  17. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    15,120
    As long as they treat them well, I don't see the problem.

    Most pets are quite happy to have an easy meal, a warm bed, a pack, a protector and a life partner. Being a pet to a human is the animal equivalent of heaven.

    Animals don't have a sense of pride or dignity. That's a human construct. They have needs. If those needs are met, they're happy. Sometimes those needs are 'hunt and kill prey' and sometimes those needs are 'run a lot in an open space' and sometimes those needs are 'breed'. Again, if they are treated well - i.e. their needs are met - cruelty is the last thing petdom is.

    So, the problem is not that they're kept as pets - even if it's to look cool - the problem is whether they are being cared for as to their needs.
     
  18. Seattle Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,489
    Reading, common sense. I'm sure it depends on the animal. Not everyone who has made a pet out of a Tiger has been killed but enough have to make me think they aren't great pet material.
     
  19. sculptor Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,234
    circa 1980, I bought a 3 flat in Chicago
    3 story brick building with a stone foundation and a crawl space instead of basement.
    Among it's other uninvited guests, it had rats
    While building my studio in the back with my friend/helper Bob
    I saw a weasel in the backyard
    weasels are used to punching above their weight, so I tend to avoid contact with the entire Mustelidae family. (I had read that wolverines will even take on a grizzly bear)
    Fearless Bob picked it up and announced that it was a tame ferret/
    ok
    Ferrets are known to hunt and kill rats
    Happy meating, I introduced the ferret to the crawlspace and he had much fun disappearing down one rat hole and popping up at another
    In a few days, he had eradicated the rat population, meanwhile, I had told the neighbors about my new guest
    A couple days later, a teenage girl came to the house inquiring about her lost pet ferret.
    I invited her in and we found her pet
    I thanked her for the use of him to eradicate the unwanted rats, and she offered to loan him to me "anytime I wanted"
    He seemed very tame, and personally attached to her.
     
  20. Jeeves Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,799
    The problem is, usually, that the people who buy an exotic pet for its cachet don't have a very clear idea of how that animal ought to be treated. They treat it well - by their own dim lights - and it all too often ends up in the kind of tragedy Seattle is talking about.
    This is largely, though perhaps not universally, true of dogs that have been bred to human specifications and requirements over thousands of generations. It's approximately true of domestic housecats and only half true of feral cats. It can become true of some wild animals captured or rescued at an early age - but I wouldn't count on it. It's untrue of wild animals captured in adulthood. Though some species tolerate captivity fairly well, and a few even thrive in the progressive zoos, none are adapted to house arrest.

    That's an opinion I do not share.
    You don't have to intend cruelty to make someone suffer. Most humans fail to recognize the needs of others when those needs are incongruent with their own desires. This is equally true in all human relationships.
    The problem is not that people marry; it's that they so often make lousy husbands and wives. The problem is not that people reproduce; it's that they so often make lousy parents. The problem is not that people run for public office; it's that they so often make lousy representatives. ... whatever their reason was for doing the wrong thing, it was still wrongly done.
     
  21. billvon Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    19,047
    On the basis of friends of mine who have tried that. One was a vet. She had a regular menagerie of animals that were rescued from the wild, rescued from people who kept wild animals as pets, and rescued pets. The difference was pretty stark.
     
  22. DaveC426913 Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    15,120
    Yes, there is definitely a lot of overlap in the Venn diagram of 'people who buy animals for fun' and 'people who don't know (or care) to look after them'.



    In my opinion, to ascribe pride or dignity to animals is to anthropomorphize.

    And - I'll hazard - seamlessly moving into talking about human relationships is a strong indication of anthropomorphism at-work:
    The issue at-hand wasn't about what relationships human have - or even what relationships human have with their animals - it was about the issue of whether animals have a sense of pride or dignity. Whatever relationships we might have does not imbue them with their own sense of pride or dignity.
     
  23. sculptor Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    7,234
    lol
     

Share This Page