One way mars trip:

Discussion in 'Astronomy, Exobiology, & Cosmology' started by paddoboy, Jan 7, 2014.

  1. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    One-Way Mars Trip: Aspiring Martian Colonists Land In Washington:


    WASHINGTON — A group of volunteers hoping to become the first human Martians congregated in one spot for the first time Saturday (Aug. 3) to discuss their hopes to join the Mars One mission, a project to send colonists on a one-way trip to the Red Planet.

    Mars One CEO and co-founder Bas Lansdorp addressed a crowd of about 50 Mars One applicants, almost all male, in an auditorium here at George Washington University. The mood at the event, which was webcast live, was something akin to a gamer's LAN party — excited discussions blended with nerdy banter. But the purpose was serious.

    How many of you want to go on a one-way trip to Mars?" Lansdorp asked. Nearly everyone raised their hands. [Mars One’s Red Planet Colony Project (Gallery)]


    The Mars One colony mission, announced in May 2012, aims to send humans to Mars in 2023. Yet unlike other proposed manned Mars missions, they won't be coming back.


    http://www.space.com/22238-mars-one-private-colony-volunteers-meeting.html
     
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  3. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    One-way trip to Mars? Sign me up, says Frenchwoman:


    A comfortable, middle-class Parisian life may be the envy of many people, but Florence Porcel would give it all up to be among the first Earthlings to settle on Mars—even with no option of return.

    "I have always felt a bit cramped on Earth," the self-confessed space junkie told AFP, delighted to be shortlisted with some 1,000 other aspiring voyagers for Mars One—a private project to colonise the Red Planet from 2024.
    "I have always dreamt of exploring other worlds," the 30-year-old journalist said.
    "I am not a pilot, nor a doctor, nor an engineer; I was never going to become an astronaut through the normal channels.


    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-01-one-way-mars-frenchwoman.html#jCp
     
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  5. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    How many here would really go?
    The barrier to me offering to go, is a relatively hectic family life, but you can bet your short and curlies, if that wasn't so, or if I was alone, I would definitely vollunteer.

    Obviously, the main concern from an onlookers point of view, is how fair dinkum are these Entrepeneurs?
    Or is this just one big stunt for a supposed reality TV show?

    I certainly hope not.
     
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  7. Buddha12 Valued Senior Member

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    Suicide should never be promoted by anyone and a mission like this is exactly that.
     
  8. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    That's taking an extreme, extreme view of the situation.
    Absolute screening of the original 200,000 odd thousand Applicants is taking place, so as to get the best people...People with that "indomitable spirit", "good judgement", and "a good sense of fair play", along with being drug and disease free.
    They will also be looked after, long after the landings of those that undertake the final trip, and every effort will be made to supply all essential needs for as long as is humanly possible.
    Plus of course they will be utilizing natural Martian resources.
    .
    Do military personel sent off to war commit suicide?

    To call it suicide is extreme to say the least.
     
  9. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    So is life. Yet most of us choose that mission.
     
  10. brucep Valued Senior Member

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    That's why anybody going on a mission that has the potential for some kind of failure that will result in death needs to be a grown up. Like being in combat. Your comment is so not thought out. Nobody is promoting suicide. Everybody needs to realize the risk. They don't need some dumb law telling them that it's an automatic suicide.
     
  11. brucep Valued Senior Member

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    Seems like a lot of my life has been suicide mission to suicide mission.
     
  12. Sorcerer Put a Spell on you Registered Senior Member

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    Well, that's really so kind of you! We're really grateful for that!

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  13. Sorcerer Put a Spell on you Registered Senior Member

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    Well, that's right, but then you need to calculate what that risk is. If a soldier goes off to war then there is a good chance that he/she will return home. Here there is no chance. So would Mars be a substitute for home? You have a partner, I suppose, but the sojourn would likely last a few months, or years at best, living in a cubicle and probably in ill health. That may not be suicide but I understand what the poster meant.
     
  14. siledre Registered Senior Member

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    From mans very beginning, his first steps were fraught with peril, whenever someone left their village towards where none they knew of had gone before, they took their lives in their hands, when the first boats laid course across the oceans, I'm sure most thought they would never survive, and a lot didn't. pushing ourselves to find new parameters and livable areas and great discoveries always has a risk attached. the benefits of discovery by the few lay the groundwork for the many to follow.
     
  15. Boris2 Valued Senior Member

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    i don't think these people realise how boring it would become. say they pick 30 year olds. they'll have maybe 50 years of living in a cramped shelter and if they want to go outside then in a cramped spacesuit. there are no living things to study, no green, just endless red. unless they really like red and rocks then it will get boring. sure they'll have stuff to do, but for 50 years?
     
  16. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    So, not volunteering Scorcerer?

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    The way I see it is this......As the poster before this one has said, any venture, and exploratory efforts have always been risky.
    If this all goes to plan, and each living module and Lab modules all land safely along with the Astronauts, then from that point, they will be expected to live off the Mars, [so to speak] with other supplies being ferried from Earth.
    The hard part will then have been done.
    No, in all likelyhood they wont be coming back, but remembering this is to take place in 2023, who knows what the situation maybe like then?
    And they are volunteers...They know full well what to expect, probably far more than the Pilgrims on the Mayflower were expecting.
     
  17. Sorcerer Put a Spell on you Registered Senior Member

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    Damn right I'm not! I'm not out of my tiny mind, that's why.

    Why would you want to live in a porta-loo until you die? For nothing that couldn't be explored using robots.
     
  18. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    You may not be out of your mind, but neither are those that have been short listed for this adventure I would Imagine.
    In fact most are obviously Intelligent, successful human beings.
    And of course it's more than a porta-loo, although obviously challenging....Therein lies the drive to do this for some.
     
  19. brucep Valued Senior Member

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    That's just your opinion. You're trying to argue I shouldn't have the desire to do anything if YOU think the risk doesn't warrant it. Your opinion is not going into force anytime soon. I said HOW IT IS and you want to qualify to what YOU THINK IT SHOULD BE. I'm not going anywhere and I've had a partner for 45 years. Your opinion should be lining the round file.
     
  20. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    They will most certainly be intelligent people, and all the realizations of such a trip [if successful] would be quite obvious......Boring??, maybe at times, but who on Earth is not bored at times.
    And as you mentioned, they will have plenty to do.
    Your mentioning of the endless red reminds me of the remark Buzz Aldrin made on the Moon, about the magnificent desolation.
     
  21. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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  22. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    These Pioneers would be remembered in future eons as opening up a new frontier, as has happened many times on Earth.
    Before the discovery of the Americas some thought they would fall off the edge of the Earth. That didn't stop voyages of exploration though.
     
  23. brucep Valued Senior Member

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    Now you're saying folks who would want to be part of a manned mission to mars are out of their mind. That's just your opinion dude. What does your opinion have to do with the risks? Nothing. There's a dude posting in this forum who sued to delay the startup on the LHC based on his scientific illiterate opinion. So we get it. You don't think folks should take any risks associated with space travel and extended stays on mars. Use a logic path to determine whether a manned space flight to mars is going to do the same stuff we've been doing so successfully with robots. Scientists check stuff and like to do experiments so lots of that could be done over time. You really think that stuff would be the reason for the mission? Double checking the robots results?
     

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