Objective truth - from a Buddhist perspective #01

Discussion in 'General Philosophy' started by Quantum Quack, Dec 21, 2008.

  1. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    But, there are so many ''Truths.'' My Truth may not be someone else's Truth.

    Or truth.

    Absolute Truth is most likely what we are most comfortable in believing. If a Truth (or truth) is forced upon us, it's less likely to be believed as absolute. I've come back to believing in a deity, and that is My Truth, no one forced it upon me, and it brings me peace. Can I give my absolute Truth to another? Can I convince someone else of my absolute Truth?

    Going even further, absolute Truth is really a forever winding path, and not a final destination, in my mind's eye.
     
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  3. Quantum Quack Life's a tease... Valued Senior Member

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    The issue is more about independence of your own perceptions I think wegs

    Objectivity:
    Objectivity is a central philosophical concept, related to reality and truth, which has been variously defined by sources. Generally, objectivity means the state or quality of being true even outside of a subject's individual biases, interpretations, feelings, and imaginings. A proposition is generally considered objectively true (to have objective truth) when its truth conditions are met without biases caused by feelings, ideas, opinions, etc., of a sentient subject. A second, broader meaning of the term refers to the ability in any context to judge fairly, without partiality or external influence. This second meaning of objectivity is sometimes used synonymously with neutrality.
    src; wiki
     
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  5. surreptitious57 Registered Member

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    Perfection is unobtainable but eradicating imperfection in part if not in whole is entirely possible
    Freedom is in accepting reality as it is without trying to interpret it to conform to ones worldview
    We are only passing through this life so should try to remember it is not our ultimate destination
    If death be no more than an eternity of pain free non consciousness fearing it is merely irrational
     
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  7. Spellbound Banned Valued Senior Member

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    Perfection is obtainable. It is matchless and absolutely unified. Also, you do not know what happens after death except for the cessation of the functioning of the physical body. You can take your personal definition of freedom and shove it back up your ass.
     
  8. surreptitious57 Registered Member

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    So how does one attain perfection? I never said that I know what happens after death and I do not
    What is wrong with my personal definition of freedom? Am I not more free than I have ever been?
     
  9. Spellbound Banned Valued Senior Member

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    Intellect.

    When you said freedom is in accepting reality as it is you sounded like the atheistic loser who put up the "Actual Freedom" website. A website devoted to actual lies and misinformation. A website that attempts to use power of suggestion to suck people in to delusion and fantasy. I didn't even know it until I moved into a new place with lots of residents with a chance to make new friends a few months ago and an unseen force shoved my bed and tried to twist my head back before it shouted "YES!" with an evil voice. It was an obvious attempt at Satanic possession. Thankfully, that was the only time it had ever happened. And no, it is not a belief.
     
  10. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    It's interesting whom Satan wants to possess.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
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  11. surreptitious57 Registered Member

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    My definition of personal freedom is only applicable to me as it is not my job to educate others upon how they
    can achieve it. Even if they agree with the definition they have to apply it themselves. The web site is not some
    thing I would utilise for personal growth for it alludes to absolute truth. And I reject nearly all varieties of that
     
  12. wegs Matter & Pixie Dust Valued Senior Member

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    How does or can one reach independence from his/her own perceptions? How could we ever really be sure that what we are experiencing, is still not yet a personal perception of the experience?
     
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  13. Quantum Quack Life's a tease... Valued Senior Member

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    We can't!
    It is only when we observe absolutely nothing ( Nirvana ) that we observe the objective truth... which essentially is my point about Buddhist thinking. To obseve absolutely nothing one must become nothing, which ironically is what we do when we are totally unconscious ( asleep )

    Basically the thinking is that the pseudo-existence of the universe is entirely temporal and the product of our collective egos. ( observed subjectively by those that live with in it ) However those that can observe it in it's entirety can come close to observing it objectively. Coming close to objective observation is not quite the same as actual objective observation. ( when dealing with absolute terms ) To "observe" means to be separate to or aloof to in some way which immediately defeats the proposition due to the inherent dualism.

    "One can only "be" the truth, not "see" the truth " ~anon (re: non-dualism)
     
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  14. Baldeee Valued Senior Member

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    While I agree that we can't, I don't agree that we observe nothing when we are asleep, nor that we are totally unconscious when we are asleep.
    We retain some consciousness even if it is not the full state that we enjoy while awake.
    It is certainly a different level of consciousness to when we are "out cold" so to speak, when we are utterly unresponsive to outside stimulus.
    But during sleep we are faintly aware (some more so than others) of the outside world.
    Our dreams change according to what we are perceiving, incorporate those perceptions into the dreamworld.
    Further, if we were totally unconscious we would not wake with daylight, with the alarm, with someone calling us.
     
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