Nomophobia. Do you have it?

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by scheherazade, Feb 18, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. scheherazade Northern Horse Whisperer Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,788
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. scheherazade Northern Horse Whisperer Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,788
    LOL.....

    KJ, I suspect you would deliberately trip a girl to have her fall into your waiting arms.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,493
    I believe in the following statement. Careful what you wish for, you might actually get it. Fantasy has a way of burning you if you go for it, and if I knew her well enough to want her in my arms I wouldn't want to trip her.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    51,736
    I see it all the time where I work, people texting as they walk down stairs. I haven't seen anyone fall yet...
     
  8. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,075
    Been trying to reactivate my phone for the last couple of days: it hasn't been used since 7/2011. Turns out that I need a new SIM card. I'm not a social person and most my calls are usually to family members, so I'm not tied to my phone. I do know people who seem to be on their phones often. There does seem to be a dependency.
     
  9. scheherazade Northern Horse Whisperer Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,788
    It has become an issue at the workplace, more among the younger folk who have been raised with the technology but also with some of the more mature staff.

    People have been disciplined for violating the policy against having these devices on the work floor. They not only cause reduced productivity but they put people in danger where equipment is in operation.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!



    It's a dependency that I personally do not understand either. Anyone who needs to reach me in an emergency while I am at work can call the store and have me paged.

    My friends and acquaintances know that I will tear their heads off if it is NOT an emergency. I take my job seriously.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  10. billvon Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    12,723
    No need to trip her when you can just text her and have her walk into a potted plant!
     
  11. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,493
    I wanted to do something similar to that, but she was driving my car and I just couldn't bring myself to do it.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  12. river Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    9,182
    so people is Nomophobia real then ?

    I don't have a cell
     
  13. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,493
    Personally I don't have a clue. But no one can deny the impact they have. I didn't get my first cell phone until my late 40's, but I've sure wondered what life would have been like had I gone to high school with cell phones. Now I no longer have a land line, nor would I ever want to go back to just land lines. Always remember just because the phone rings, doesn't mean you have to answer it and If I don't have a very good idea who's calling me I never answer the phone.
     
  14. scheherazade Northern Horse Whisperer Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,788
    Check out what comes up when you type in the question, "Is cell phone anxiety real?"

    Also known as Separation Anxiety Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder.

    http://www.google.ca/search?q=is ce...s=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

    Interestingly, separation anxiety is very common among horses, a herd animal, which tends to form strong social bonds. :bugeye:

    The horse that I ride away from the property seems quite content with it's lot, while the two left behind will frequently lament quite vocally.
     
  15. scheherazade Northern Horse Whisperer Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,788
    LOL.....fortunate then that I am immune to such distractions being from the generation that knows how to keep men waiting.....and happily at that.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!



    Anticipation is a much more pleasant emotion than anxiety, IMO.
     
  16. scheherazade Northern Horse Whisperer Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,788
    With the hours that I keep, my answering machine is indispensable. It's also useful for screening calls to avoid talking to all the telemarketers and phone hustlers.
     
  17. wynn ˙ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    15,058
    So what should they do instead? Be like unresponsive rocks? Would that be more normal, instead of the psychopathology of "separation anxiety"?
     
  18. scheherazade Northern Horse Whisperer Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,788
    I find it interesting that the single horse is not the one vocalizing or acting insecure. The other two have each other for company.

    I take that to be a sign of trust on the part of the horse I am riding, which is ever the goal in my interactions with the species. Whichever of the three I am riding, they do not lack confidence to leave the safety of the yard.

    Whichever pair remains in the yard is quite safe so I suspect they are voicing some other desire besides anxiety.

    I merely felt there was a bit of a correlation in this similarity of behavior between humans and horses, to be seemingly concerned about what precisely, when there is no evidence of anything to be concerned about.
     
  19. KilljoyKlown Whatever Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,493
    They all want to be the chosen one and complain when left behind.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  20. wynn ˙ Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    15,058
    I strongly dislike this kind of language when it comes to talking about animals - it's so full of projection.


    As for "when there is no evidence of anything to be concerned about" - I think many people presume far far too much about themselves and how much their animals trust them and like them.


    You broke those horses in, you broke their will. I don't think they have forgotten that.
    If anything, in terms of human psychology, they may have an insecure/ambivalent attachment to you (and other humans).
    They may look like normal horses to humans, but from a strictly horse perspective, they may be neurotic.
     
  21. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    51,736
    Horses do the same thing to each other, that's why it works so well, and most of those emotions are typical of mammals, not just people.
     
  22. scheherazade Northern Horse Whisperer Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,788
    Horses enjoy mental and physical stimulation and they are well aware that when we do things together that I use treats for rewards so that may well be one of their considerations.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  23. scheherazade Northern Horse Whisperer Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    3,788
    It's undeniable that we project our own perspective onto our relationships with animals, as we do also with our relationships with other humans.


    Indeed, much of an animal's regard for us comes from the fact that they associate us with food, shelter and security. Again, how does this differ from human/human relationships?


    I teach animals, wynn, by the use of psychology, affection, special food rewards and positive reinforcement. All who have met my horses remark that they are the most friendly and inquisitive horses they have met, even the vet, who is a horsewoman herself. They certainly have a will and they are permitted to question my judgments. I value their input as our mutual safety depends on being observant of our surroundings, which are constantly changing.

    Horses have been a domesticated species for thousands of years so it may be difficult to determine what a 'strictly horse perspective' might be.

    From observing feral horses in a natural setting, it has been determined that they are a hierarchy species, and they continue to demonstrate this behavior despite all these generations of domestication.

    Humans have learned to work with horses by insinuating themselves into this hierarchy mentality.

    As long as the human is consistent and trustworthy, most horses are quite content to follow a leader.

    Humans are largely inconsistent and unpredictable and for this reason many people encounter behavior problems with their horses. Horses expect consistency and will question the conduct of humans who send mixed signals.

    My horses live outdoors year round with access to run in shelters and natural cover. In the summer they have access to graze and wild forage although cured grass hay, grown locally, is the staple of their diet. I strive to provide them with as close to natural living conditions for their species as is possible in an era when the human species is decimating the habitat of many wild species.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page