New Species can Develop in as little as Two Generations:

Discussion in 'Biology & Genetics' started by paddoboy, Nov 24, 2017.

  1. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    Galapagos study finds that new species can develop in as little as two generations:

    The arrival 36 years ago of a strange bird to a remote island in the Galapagos archipelago has provided direct genetic evidence of a novel way in which new species arise.


    In this week's issue of the journal Science, researchers from Princeton University and Uppsala University in Sweden report that the newcomer belonging to one species mated with a member of another species resident on the island, giving rise to a new species that today consists of roughly 30 individuals.

    The study comes from work conducted on Darwin's finches, which live on the Galapagos Islands in the Pacific Ocean. The remote location has enabled researchers to study the evolution of biodiversity due to natural selection.



    Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-11-galapagos-species.html#jCp

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    the paper:
    http://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2017/11/20/science.aao4593

    Rapid hybrid speciation in Darwin’s finches:

    Abstract
    Homoploid hybrid speciation in animals has been inferred frequently from patterns of variation, but few examples have withstood critical scrutiny. Here we report a directly documented example from its origin to reproductive isolation. An immigrant Darwin’s finch to Daphne Major in the Galápagos archipelago initiated a new genetic lineage by breeding with a resident finch (Geospiza fortis). Genome sequencing of the immigrant identified it as a G. conirostris male that originated on Española >100km from Daphne. From the second generation onwards the lineage bred endogamously, and despite intense inbreeding, was ecologically successful and showed transgressive segregation of bill morphology. This example shows that reproductive isolation, which typically develops over hundreds of generations, can be established in only three.
     
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  3. Q-reeus Valued Senior Member

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    WTF? That beat-up article whose catchy title implies much more than it delivers (hybridization - hardly a new big deal) most definitely does not belong in A E & C.
     
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  5. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    That's called journalism old friend, something we all indulge in from time to time including yourself with false provocative and sensationalisitc headlines.
    Dang me, dang me, they ought to take a rope and hang me....

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    You are correct of course qreeus, but if a mod thinks its important enough to move I'm OK with that.With regards to it not being a big deal, again perhaps you should note from the Abstract in the paper, "Homoploid hybrid speciation in animals has been inferred frequently from patterns of variation, but few examples have withstood critical scrutiny. Here we report a directly documented example from its origin to reproductive isolation." A big enough deal for a paper I suggest and further research to add more concrete certainty to the theory of Evolution.
     
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  7. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    Thank you to the mod who moved this to the correct section, and of course thanks to the ever alert qreeus for bringing it to my attention!

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  8. Q-reeus Valued Senior Member

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    Think nothing of it paddoboy - which I'm sure is the case.

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  9. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    Not half as sure as I am about your intentions qreeus old son.

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