Nearest Star.

Discussion in 'Free Thoughts' started by TheFrogger, Jun 1, 2019.

  1. TheFrogger Valued Senior Member

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    Hi. Here's a question: if you were in London, England, and you placed an object representing the Sun on the floor, and then placed another object, representing Earth, ten paces from the Sun, on that scale, where is the nearest star?

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  3. Beer w/Straw Transcendental Ignorance! Valued Senior Member

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    I can copy Maple text as MathML but I can't seem to be able to convert it to Tex...

    Anyway, a pace can be a unit of length of 0.75 meters. Alpha Centauri is 4.37 light years away from our star system.

    I have better things to do than care about learning shit programing in Tex, and this site may just have shit, outdated and unfriendly software.
     
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  5. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

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    The nearest star would 10 paces.

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    Alpha Centuri would be approximately 2,700 km away. That is assuming 10 paces = 3o m. That is also assuming I didn't make an arithmetic error!
     
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  7. Beer w/Straw Transcendental Ignorance! Valued Senior Member

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    Just one university using Maple (others could use MATLAB, Mathematica, or whatever) is more than enough to say this forum sucks for lack of point and click capability.

    Why can I not just easily use MathML and why would Maple only allow to copy expressions in MathML?
     
  8. TheFrogger Valued Senior Member

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    The answer is on that scale, the nearest star (excluding the sun) would be in Johannesberg.

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  9. Beer w/Straw Transcendental Ignorance! Valued Senior Member

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    I didn't even try to answer your question; I was bitching.
     
  10. TheFrogger Valued Senior Member

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    I noticed. Now you know the answer, what do you think?
     
  11. Janus58 Valued Senior Member

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    Quick "back of the envelope" estimate. 4.37 ly, using the Julian uear of 365.25 day equals 2,298,445 light min. The Earth is roughly 8 light min from the Sun, so at at 10 paces, that is 1.25 paces per light min, which puts Alpha C at a distance of 2,873,056 paces. If you did your recommended 10,000 steps per day, it would take you 287 days or 79% of a year to cover that distance.
     
  12. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    In space, the numbers are awful........

    (Hitch-hiker's Guide).
     
  13. Beer w/Straw Transcendental Ignorance! Valued Senior Member

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    As in radio waves?

    Why don't you tell me....
     
  14. TheFrogger Valued Senior Member

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    I think it's an incredibly great distance. From that distance, the Earth is flat.

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    I saw the question on, "Porridge," an English sit-com set in prison.

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  15. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    Ten paces from Earth.
     
  16. TheFrogger Valued Senior Member

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    ...excluding the Sun...
     
  17. Gawdzilla Sama Valued Senior Member

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    2 L8.
     
  18. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    Ronnie Barker!
     
  19. TheFrogger Valued Senior Member

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    Yes Ronnee Barkay.

    Actually I wrote, "excluding the Sun" earlier in thread. The post where I revealed the answer.
     

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