Nanotubes and Bucky Balls

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by USS Exeter, Dec 15, 2007.

  1. USS Exeter unamerican american Registered Senior Member

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    Nanotubes
    The single wall is created when a single molecular layer of graphite is rolled to form a tube structure. Also, multilayer nanotubes that form a coaxial assembly of the single layer tubes inside one another. Basically they are one-dimensional objects with a well-defined direction along the nanotube axis that is analogous to the in-plane directions of graphite.

    Bucky Balls
    A truncated icosahedron, the most round symmetrical object created by man. They are purely carbon based and can withstand tremendous amounts of force. A bucky ball launched at 24,000km/h and was slammed into a steel plate and merely bounced back with ablsolutly no change.

    These molecular creations all have a strenth per weight that is of 10 to 100 times greater than steel or almost any man-made alloy we have. What are some uses for these structures?
     
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  3. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    A tube CANNOT be a one-dimensional structure. Want to try that one again??
     
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  5. USS Exeter unamerican american Registered Senior Member

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    I was speaking figuratively for how small they are, try to figure it out.
     
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  7. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    If that were actually the case it would have been more accurate for you to have said they were practically non-dimensional since they are so small.

    Just try to keep it accurate, though, and leave out the editorializing, OK?

    Back to your original question, though, they would have almost limitless structural engineering possibilities. But keep one important thing in mind - carbon burns!
     
  8. USS Exeter unamerican american Registered Senior Member

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    Compounds then, what about a silicon composite for example? Nanotubes could be for distributing electronic signals. For all I know, they could be the key to a super-advanced microchip? I'm just throwing ideas around, any other thoughts?
     
  9. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    I cannot think of any reason at all why they would have any applications involving computing or electronics in general. Even though carbon is classed as a conductor, it's a very poor one compared to many other materials.

    The real benefits are going to be in it's strength - and that why I said structural applications.
     
  10. pjdude1219 screw watergate i want to know about zaragate Valued Senior Member

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    i think they all ready have built houses based on the bucky ball
     
  11. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    You're thinking of geodesic dome structures. Not quite the same thing as actually using buckeyballs.
     
  12. USS Exeter unamerican american Registered Senior Member

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    With a strength 100 times greater than steel, its uses in structure would be nano-hardware. Since you did mention that carbon could not be used before any other conductor, you are right, electronic usage for nanotubes is highly unliklely. Nano-structures is their future. Quote me if you have any other ideas.
     
  13. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    Carbon nanotubes have some battery applications, they have potential for stealth aircraft coatings and composite airfoil structures. They are fireproof and well insulating. Being tubes, they can be used as filters and drug delivery systems.
     
  14. Sangamon Registered Member

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    undestructible cars/buildings/planes/laptops/ipods/whatever


    But space is where it's at. The combination of lightness and strength...yummie
    Space elevator anyone?
     
  15. CarvedMercury Registered Member

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    Graphites used as an electrical conductor, why not nanotubes then?
     
  16. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    Sure it's a conductor - but compared to several other materials it's a very poor conductor.
     
  17. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    I can buy the fact that they would have good insulating properties, but FIREPROOF? I can't accept that - they're made of carbon and carbon burns.
     
  18. CarvedMercury Registered Member

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    Nanotubes are actually superconductors. Also a problem with nanotubes is that even a tiny flaw causes them to become much weaker.
     
  19. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    Woah! Where did you pick up that bit of misinformation - that they are superconductors??? That's just nonsense.
     
  20. CarvedMercury Registered Member

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    From a misinformed person, duh!

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

    Yeah sorry meant its a semiconductor.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2007
  21. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    Carbon nanotubes are created in a furnace in a special atmosphere. They resemble nothing more than congealed soot.
     
  22. Read-Only Valued Senior Member

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    So? No problem with that. But they and soot are both still carbon and it burns. So why did you say they are fireproof??
     
  23. spidergoat Valued Senior Member

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    I know a scientist who is developing this material for fireproof suits. It has much better fire proofing qualities than nomex. Electrodes for EDM are made of carbon. I could be wrong about it's insulating properties. Apparently, it is the best thermal conductor known. The properties of nanotubes are much different than that of pure carbon, the structure makes all the difference.
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2007

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