Music

Discussion in 'Art & Culture' started by jmpet, Jun 8, 2009.

  1. jmpet Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,891
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. EmmZ It's an animal thing Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,449
    Why? And I'll see your Mozart and raise you a Bach's unfinished Contrapunctus XVI. Who left the piece unfinished because if the perfect piece of music was ever finished what else could there ever be written again? Bach himself felt this piece was perfect and I'm not sure if he ever knew how it ended himself, but he felt leaving unfinished would allow music to continue. I think many artists have felt the same way about a piece, Malevich's White on White was his "End of Art" piece. I think perhaps this idea that a one utterly perfect masterpiece will put an end to all concluding works is probably a little conceited. There can be no perfect art, because art is not finite. I leave you with Bach http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JbM3VTIvOBk
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    33,264
    Wouldn't the "most important" music ever written be written by all composers who ever lived for to them, they had written the best they could at the time they composed it. Who are we who no little about composing going to say which is the best of all time? We are but mortals listening to them who compose not to judge but to enjoy what they they have done.

    Please Register or Log in to view the hidden image!

     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. Giambattista sssssssssssssssssssssssss sssss Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,878
    Nice! I love Bach, and CPE is my favorite of his sons.

    Nice quartet, too. I suppose it was written for keyboard, but transcriptions always breathe new life into songs, don't they? Try looking for Bach's Italian Concerto (for keyboard) transcribed for orchestra. I heard it ONCE, but it is a rare find. I think the CD was out of print and very expensive when I looked it up.
     
  8. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    25,817
  9. skaught The field its covered in blood Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,100
  10. jmpet Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,891
  11. EmmZ It's an animal thing Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,449
  12. cosmictraveler Be kind to yourself always. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    33,264
  13. PsychoTropicPuppy Bittersweet life? Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,538
  14. Me-Ki-Gal Banned Banned

    Messages:
    4,634
    Music ? Joe Pass on guitar Oscar Peterson on Piano and Toots Thielman on harmonica . It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing
    Chopin is probably my favorite classical all though the rest of those old bastards are good too. They are musicians after all
     
  15. spidergoat Venued Serial Membership Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    53,152
  16. Me-Ki-Gal Banned Banned

    Messages:
    4,634
    You are definitely not talking about Me here. Ear training is essential . I know I am immoral . I knew it at a very young age. Music is a funny thing . Sound is recycled to tell you the truth. You would be surprised! There are only so many note combination's creating harmony that the average persons ear will except as sounding good . Most of the classical works have ridged rules based in the day they where written . Specific harmony does and don't, Rhythms of specific values . You take jazz now and you can see the advancement of harmonic structure where it is not based in diatonic confinements . More utilization of the chromatic scale . The walking base with overlapped rhythms would have driven Bach mad. His ear could not Handel it . He would first have to have ear training before he could except it as sounding good . I run head into this all the time with other musicians too so don't think nothing of it in your self . They will say " That don't sound right yet it will be some old worn out line used in a classical piece like a hammer on sustain the first note being the major 7th going to the root kind of thing that creates a wobble effect of discourse. Yet when they listen back to it in a recording they say shit that sounds good , or if they are observing instead of playing along they say F---ck that is good .
    Anyway EAR TRAINING and you to will be able to appreciate more music in your life
     
  17. Me-Ki-Gal Banned Banned

    Messages:
    4,634
    I am so glad you found a sound you can relate to J ster. Me so insensitive to your needs , Sorry my man . Anyway I gots to give the clowns in the world some more musical advice .

    You all are real suckers when it comes to the suspended 4th let Me tell you . It is not called the suspended 4th for nothing . It builds tension in the sound and when it resolves the a 3rd major or minor that tension is released like a good ejaculation . Most people cling to that one sound more than any other I do believe . In music going from the root chord to the 4th chord is the same effect and that is why so many songs ( 2 chord songs ) go root 4 . The other sound you all like so much is the 5 chord yet the worlds will not hardly except parallel 5ths if you use them in full diatonic form . Now you will it it is in power chord structure like in rock and roll . but the rock and roller will go out side the diatonic structure to compensate for the ill effects of parallel 5ths . They use a 5 tone scale to achieve the satisfactory sound . It is called the pentatonic scale and it is the rockers best friend. The old great composers of the past knew how to utilize the harmonic minor scale which has an accidental note in it. And extra note so to speak . It is somewhat like what we call the blue note and Jazz was born from that very "blue note" That is my personal take on the evolution of the modern sound . When the blue kachina falls from the sky people. Wala The "Blue Note"
    Don't forget expand your mind "Ear Training" it will improve your intelligence, don't go by
    Me , I have learning disabilities that extenuate the circumstances. You can be smarter just by ear training . I think science has already proven that
     
  18. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

    Messages:
    24,690
    When ragtime music started to become popular around the turn of the last century, a large minority of the American people couldn't stand to listen to it. Ragtime is one of the early styles of music that blended together to create jazz, and what ragtime brought to the mix was heavy syncopation. People in the West were accustomed to a steady metronome beat: ONE-two-THREE-four. To hear the "wrong" beats accented, or worse yet, accented eighth notes stuck between unaccented quarter notes, in a pattern that went more than one or two bars before repeating faithfully, made them uncomfortable.

    Most Westerners hadn't been exposed to such a complex pattern unless they'd spent time in the less developed countries with their so-called "primitive" rhythms. Of course many people were adventurous or cosmopolitan enough--or just wanted to fit in with the crowd--that they managed to get used to it and started to like it. But there were enough who didn't, to support bands that played the old-fashioned way.

    Nowadays of course almost all music in the developed world is highly syncopated. Intricate syncopation patterns are one of the defining elements of rock and roll, often several strikingly different ones in the same song. Reggae takes it a step further; its "one drop" beat is doubly syncopated: (null) two THREE four (null) two THREE four.

    Show tunes, movie and TV background music, commercial jingles, children's music, modern dance accompaniment, country and western tunes, even songs of faith and prayer--they all have syncopation and many have an unapologetic rock beat. Even old songs from the Tin Pan Alley era have been subtly re-scored with a backbeat, in order to appeal to people under 70.

    Our ears have been trained--first to tolerate syncopation, then to understand it, then to like it, and now... to expect it.
     

Share This Page