More pasta, less weight

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Plazma Inferno!, Jul 5, 2016.

  1. Plazma Inferno! Ding Ding Ding Ding Administrator

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    Pasta as a traditional component of Mediterranean diet (MeD) in Italy has not been studied in detail in the management of body weight. The new study aimed at evaluating the association of pasta intake with body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio, in two large epidemiological datasets.
    A total of 14‚ÄČ402 participants aged greater than or equal to35 years randomly recruited from the general population of the Molise region (Moli-sani cohort) and 8964 participants aged >18 years from all over Italy (Italian Nutrition & HEalth Survey, INHES) were separately analyzed. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-food frequency questionnaire and one 24-h dietary recall were used for dietary assessment. Weight, height, waist and hip circumference were measured in Moli-sani or self-reported in INHES. Residuals methodology corrected for either total energy intake or body weight was used for the analysis of pasta intake.
    Results of the study show that higher pasta intake was associated with better adhesion to MeD in both genders.
    As a traditional component of Mediterranean diet, pasta consumption was negatively associated with BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio and with a lower prevalence of overweight and obesity.

    http://www.nature.com/nutd/journal/v6/n7/full/nutd201620a.html
     
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  3. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    The bottom line is that pasta, as consumed my Europeans on a Mediterranean Diet didn't make people fat as it contributed to them staying on an otherwise healthy diet.

    Pasta, in the quantities consumed by fat Americans still contributes toward making them fat.

    It's still calories in and calories out and always will be.

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  5. exchemist Valued Senior Member

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    I wouldn't mind betting that the sauces that Americans put on their pasta will quite often have added sugar in them, which is quite unnecessary.

    I continue to suspect that that it is the conditioning, by fizzy drinks, of the American palate to sweetness, that is largely responsible for their obesity epidemic. In other words, the hidden calories in the form of simple sugar, rather than complex carbohydrate, may be the trouble. I feel sure a lot could be achieved if the next generation of American children were discouraged from drinking sweet fizzy drinks at meal times.

    By the way the headline again utterly misrepresents the actual research findings. It is not that more pasta makes you thinner, it is that closer adherence to a Mediterranean diet makes you thinner - and that such a diet includes a lot a pasta.
     
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  7. Stoniphi obscurely fossiliferous Valued Senior Member

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  8. Seattle Valued Senior Member

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    It includes pasta often, not necessarily a lot of pasta. Sugar is the biggest problem no doubt but pasta quickly becomes glucose as well.

    Excess calories is what makes people fat. Lack of nutrients is what makes them even more unhealthy. It's the high caloric foods that make it easy to become fat.

    You can't eat donuts, drink soft drinks and then eat some other foods that provide your nutrients and not become fat.

    The Mediterranean diet doesn't include "all you can eat" pasta.

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