man made super structure question.

Discussion in 'Architecture & Engineering' started by EmptyForceOfChi, May 22, 2007.

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  1. EmptyForceOfChi Banned Banned

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    is it possible for humans to develop and construct something so huge that it creates its own gravitational pull?


    if we could make something as big and dense as the moon would it give off its own gravity?


    also can we drill through the moon untill we reach the other side, and drop something down inside of it to see what happens?



    peace.
     
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  3. Oli Heute der Enteteich... Registered Senior Member

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    Given the budget and the political will why not?

    So does something as big and dense as the moon have gravity already? Yup.

    Not so far. Technological limitations, financial limitations etc. etc.
     
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  5. redarmy11 Registered Senior Member

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    Could we create a big metal shoe and boot every planet except ours into the sun? Bearing in mind the technological limitations, financial limitations etc. etc.?
     
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  7. Oli Heute der Enteteich... Registered Senior Member

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    What is this? Ask the engineer?
    Where are you going to lever the boot from?
     
  8. redarmy11 Registered Senior Member

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    The moon, of course. Where do you think - alpha centauri? Idiot.
     
  9. Oli Heute der Enteteich... Registered Senior Member

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    Well duh, how many of the planets get into booting distance from the moon? You'd need a LEG as well, which you failed to specify.
     
  10. Nickelodeon Banned Banned

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    If we could, yes. But then you would need the material from somewhere in the first place. Anyway all matter is attracted to each other so technically anything would have a gravitational pull, however how strong that pull is depends on the amount of matter. Something as big and dense as the moon would have the attraction of.....the moon.

    You could but we probably know the answer anyway, the object would oscillate for awhile perhaps, of even forever if no other forces interfered.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2007
  11. EmptyForceOfChi Banned Banned

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    so, could we harness some sort of energy from bieng at the center of gravity? like if we got to the core of the moon, wich i assume is cold and easy to get to, could we manage to get some sort of unlimited energy supply from the center of gravity?

    peace.
     
  12. Nickelodeon Banned Banned

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    Er, no I don't see how. There is no unlimited "energy" source at the centre of gravity of an object. The centre of gravity is just a point towards which gravity appears to act, ie a person on the surface would be pulled towards the point located at centre of gravity. If you were at the centre of gravity of the moon (in a big cave or something) you would probably just float around.
     
  13. EmptyForceOfChi Banned Banned

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    well atleast it would be cool.

    peace.
     
  14. orcot Valued Senior Member

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    It would be verry hard to make a body that creates any significant gravity through sheer mass alone because any man made object even if it's the size of a planet would be mostly hollow (office spaces corridors etc), hollow also being relative because the object would proberly lack a central superdense core.
     
  15. EmptyForceOfChi Banned Banned

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    what is it that generates the actual gravity? the weight of an object? the density of an object? the size?

    ofcourse i think the more dense something is the heavyer it will be. but if you had a huge solid ball of lead would it give off more gravity than say a huge ball of cencrete of the same size?


    peace.
     
  16. Absane Rocket Surgeon Valued Senior Member

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    I read that when the ISS is completed, it will have a gravitational pull that will pull a penny from the center of a room down to the floor in 10 minutes. Of course, I assume you'll be at the far end.
     
  17. EmptyForceOfChi Banned Banned

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    is that true?


    peace.
     
  18. orcot Valued Senior Member

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    wow is the floor that much heavier then the roof?
    I can' imagen that ther gravity force would be stronger then the deceleration drag (because of the atmosphere), so I say the strongests G would be felled on the wall at the front of the station.
     
  19. Facial Valued Senior Member

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    Every building has its own gravity. It's really a question of how much you want - in which case it still seems impractical, since something the size of Mount Everest will create negligible gravitational force relative to the earth.
     
  20. PreverseBeing Registered Member

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    The mass of an object determines it's gravity (mass to weight on earth is 1:1). The solid ball of lead has more mass than the huge ball of concrete, so the ball of lead has more gravity.

    when a small ball of iron that masses 24 kilos is compared to a large ball of scrap paper that masses 20 kilos, the small ball of iron has more gravity, although it is too small to measure.
     
  21. Klippymitch Thinker Registered Senior Member

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    I tend to have different views on gravity sure gravity is the mass of the object. But it's also the Energy. Mass and energy is somewhat the same. Since energy is what makes up mass.

    But what I don't know is how energy effects an objects gravity. For example heating up air molecules gives an hot air balloon lift that is greater than the earths gravitational pull. And a spinning Frisbee will go much farther than one that is thrown without a spin.

    But what does that mean?

    Do objects gain more or less gravity when energy is put into it?

    Edit: After thinking about it an object will have less gravity when energy is put into the object. I came to the conclusion after thinking about helium balloons. Helium is light so it floats and we know helium is not dense so it's gravity is not strong.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2007
  22. draqon Banned Banned

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    A day will come forth and ISS will give rise to larger space station, to a larger world, with possibilities Earth could not achieve, with attributes missing only Earth could give.
     
  23. Oli Heute der Enteteich... Registered Senior Member

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    Because heating the gas increases the volume and gives a greater displacement.
    Because it will generate some aerodynamic lift.
     
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