Machines Will Take Over The World!

Discussion in 'Intelligence & Machines' started by vze4p6c2, Jul 9, 2007.

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  1. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    You tend to miss certain points about Prof. Warwick's experiments. For instance what of blind/partially sighted people, they don't have wheel chairs but they do try to lead as active and as normal a lifestyle as other people.

    It's all very well to add bumps on pavements at crossing point, audible signals for crossing points 'when' of course the button is pressed however they are still limited by what tuition they have been given to deal with their impairment.

    The use of Radio Frequency equipment can aid them in tracking where they are, coupled with such radio broadcasting devices placed into the high street furnishings and the Blind could be able to venture to places they are unfamiliar with, with less fuss.

    His testing of implantation was probably his way of investigating by what means such RF devices can be fitted. I mean we all from time to time forget our car keys or mobile phone, but to most of us we have the luxury of being able to deal with it, not so for someone in a strange town, on a strange high street that will not be able to see where it was left or dropped.
     
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  3. Stryder Keeper of "good" ideas. Valued Senior Member

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    Autopilot is Predefined flight plans, the only time it's in a pilots hands in during Take-off, weather compensation, flight plan deviations and Landings.

    You could suggest that most of the cabin crew is just 'Auxiliary backup'.

    On top of that, what of the vocalised warnings for the Horizon line or Stall point?
     
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  5. srikar Registered Senior Member

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    Ok.
    but we made them.
     
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  7. Tht1Gy! Life, The universe, and e... Registered Senior Member

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    See below.:shrug:
    I heard it was a duplicity.

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  8. madanthonywayne Morning in America Staff Member

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    I read a theory that consciousness might be due to a quantum mechanical process having to do with microtubiles.
    I like the idea of conciousness being a quantum mechanical event. It seems appropriate. It might also mean the brain is a more powerful computer than we think.
     
  9. kmguru Staff Member

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    gamma EEG-synchronized sequences

    Is this an example of gobblydygook? Consciousness may be exactly that

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  10. kmguru Staff Member

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    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
    Robot Chic
    Brian Caulfield, 09.10.07, 6:00 AM ET

    BURLINGAME, CALIF. - It was a scene from a beautiful film: the dusty San Francisco evening light filtered through the large windows of the exquisite Marina mansion of PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel. Heaps of chipped ice kept shrimp and oysters cool. Waiters in black passed plates of canapés and glasses of champagne and Monterey County pinot noir.

    And as T-shirt-clad geeks nibbled, they debated just how long people would still be considered more intelligent than machines.

    Friday's soiree marked the beginning of this year's "Singularity Summit," a gathering of 900 computer scientists, techno-utopians and counterculture types, all intent on examining the proposition that machines — or rather, artificial intelligences — may one day destroy humanity. Or perhaps, save it.

    In the past, men of great wealth patronized artists, philosophers, even scientists. These days, the great wealth created by technology is going many places: Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates is trying to save children from debilitating poverty; Intel cofounder Gordon Moore worries about saving the rainforest; and venture capitalist and Facebook.com backer Thiel is fascinated with "the singularity," a term popularized by computer scientist Ray Kurzweil in his 2005 book "The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology" to describe an era when human and machine intelligence fuse to create "something bigger" than either one.

    Kurzweil believes that humans are destined to merge — not compete — with machines. "I don't think you're going to be able to walk into a room and say 'OK, humans on the left and machines on the right.'" Kurzweil said as he spoke to the conference-goers via a videolink from his office in Massachusetts. He also spoke, via videolink, to a simultaneous meeting in Cambridge, England, on how to extend human life. (Many singularity enthusiasts hope to live long enough to see the event and, presumably, become immortal by being uploaded into machines.)

    Still, many other people have taken up the theme of the future of machine intelligence. For instance, Singularity Institute Research Fellow Eliezer Yudkowsky explained over the weekend at the Singularity Summit why many believe that machines will eventually be smarter than their makers. The stunning progress in packing more computation power onto silicon chips, married with software designers’ increasing ability to take advantage of this power, virtually guarantees that machines are progressing faster than humans are. One day, machines will start building themselves, he predicted. And at that point, humans will certainly no longer be the smartest creatures in the room.

    Yet before we hit that humiliating loss of status, we'll see some jagged turns in fortune, noted others. "We've been living in a world of incredible booms and busts over the past quarter century," Thiel said in a chat with Forbes.com. He saw the dot-com boom, and subsequent bust, firsthand while at PayPal. "At the peak of the boom, you could see the future of the world with perfect clarity," he says. Then, the bottom fell out.

    The best-case scenario: Radical new technologies make life "smoothly but gradually better," as new ideas are adopted a step at a time, or "iteratively," rather than all at once, setting up a catastrophic bust, a prospect Thiel would like to avoid.

    Meanwhile, there's money to be made. The holy grail: so-called "artificial general intelligence," or the ability to pick up learning in one area and apply it in others. Those kinds of machines would not just beat humans at chess but, in the process, figure out how to play a better game of Go. For now, humans do that kind of learning easily, but machines do not.

    As machines creep towards that goal, entrepreneurs such as Barney Pell want to harness them to tackle more useful work. His company, Powerset (backed, in part, by the Founders Fund, in which Thiel is a partner), hopes to take a baby step in that direction by building a search engine that understands natural language.

    If it works, the only limit to the riches that can be made riding the trend toward greater machine intelligence may be the machines themselves. Once they become smarter than their makers, it will become hard to predict what they will do. Or what they'll ask for. "Do we confer rights to them?" an attendee sporting a "Mermen" T-shirt and fuzzy-wuzzy hair asked Pell.

    "When robots are really going to have rights is when they stand up and claim those rights," Pell answered. "So let's make them friendly so they don't claim those rights."

    How will the new breed of super-intelligences behave? Even super-smart people concede it's hard to tell. The machines will have needs, including a need for space, time, matter and free energy, explained Steve Omohundro, president of Self Aware Systems. That could be a problem. (Will they ignore us? Eat us?) But they could be designed to have a superior moral code, to be "machines of loving grace" as futurist Paul Saffo put it, borrowing from poet Richard Brautigan. In that case, these silicon-based brains could have the sort of robust moral algorithms needed to master destructive technologies such as nuclear weapons that our more primitive carbon-based brains cannot handle.

    One of Thiel's concerns, stemming from his interest in French philosopher Rene Girard, is that robots, like their human makers, could have a built-in need to compete. Would robots compete for resources, for energy sources — perhaps even for status? A powerful machine intelligence could develop the personality of an "obsessive, paranoid, psychopath," some at the conference speculated. Then again, a good one could turn out to be an ascetic — which would be, culturally speaking, a bore.

    All that conference goers could agree on is that life which machines won't be the same. And even if the machines that take over from the geeks are friendly, these new masters of the universe may not serve pinot noir.
     
  11. Tht1Gy! Life, The universe, and e... Registered Senior Member

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    Not reassuring.

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  12. MrCrowley Registered Member

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    Personally I dont think it will happen while im alive.
     
  13. kmguru Staff Member

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    Are you in your 80s? Definitely not happening in the next 20 years....but after that....may be
     
  14. JEFFLARSON Registered Member

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    i saw an article in a sience mag showing exactly how to make a emp wepon for $400
    looking at the bomb drawings i see its possible to make one that is reuseable "dosent blow up" an easy extrapilation from the orignal and cost about the same but would use liquid helium pumped through a soft copper tubing creating a near super conducting coil
    that can be segmented with couplers male to female connections and a spring loaded cam operated as a bank of large capasitors energizing the coil then unpluging segments
    as peak current hits
    this causes a microwave emp that will take out the terminators for about 20 miles
    even if there in a fariday cage ie "microwave emp"
    caution any one that has fooled around with this stuff is got lukimia or spinal canser or is dead allready
    yup none to good for humans but it takes care of the terminaters
     
  15. kmguru Staff Member

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    11,757
    A microwave oven protects the owner from EMP blast due to a faraday cage that surrounds the waves.

    All lightning bolts produce EMP blasts...to mega joules level...and travel 20 KMs...
     
  16. JEFFLARSON Registered Member

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    2kw and theay all leak a little
    2megwatt will cause spurrious emmisions from the cage itself to be retransmited both inward and outward
    this was all covered in the mag
    also the wepon would energize telephone and power lines and take out electronic devices as far as 200 miles away
    thats the device in the mag
    it uses explosives to break the coil into varying sized pices all working as an inductors in series with a cap a tank circuit so there is a very wide spectrum of freqs at very high energy levels remember super cooled copper is vary near superconducting 0 ohms
    work that out with ohms law say 1000v
    you come out with a number 8 laying on its side
    ok its not 0 ohms but perty dern close
     
  17. Panjabster Registered Member

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    machine will take over world if human allows it. machines advance in capitalist system where desire to increase efficiency drives the effort to build more and more intelligent automations. Even military, to compensate for lack of organic machines, are creating AI soldiers and non-manned planes and robots and so forth.

    evolution gave human instinct to avoid injury. for AI military robots to last long and not be distroyed, they must be programmed to avoid injury as much as possible, while at the same time not reducing their killing efficiency and productivity. To avoid injury, humans have a sense of "self identify" or a "consciousness." a human must see itself as one whole conscieous person, even though the brain is very modular. thus, a human strives to protect this "self." robots must thus be programmed to see itself as "conscious" and must be made to be very aware of all environmental inputs, like humans are. Pretty soon, AI are so smart they can see humans who made them as detrimental to the safety of their perceived "conscious selves." So they then take over the humans, maybe kill them.

    so, humans would have to have a cut-off point: robots can only be given a certain amount of intelligence, but not passed the threshhold for taking over.

    Piece.
     
  18. kmguru Staff Member

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    By then, it may be out of human hands...
     
  19. Panjabster Registered Member

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    We all gonna die regardless. So, maybe the robots will be better than humans. I might prefer my grandson to be a super-robot like "Data" from Star Trek than a stinky organic fleshy mouth-breather.
     
  20. Tht1Gy! Life, The universe, and e... Registered Senior Member

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    Oh, that makes it all OK then.:bugeye:
    Are You Insane ? :crazy:
     
  21. Panjabster Registered Member

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    Insane in the membrane, chizel pizel, dawg,

    peace

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  22. Tht1Gy! Life, The universe, and e... Registered Senior Member

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    Did you think of that yourself?
     
  23. ltcmmdr Registered Senior Member

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    129
    machines taking over

    Will that ever happen?
     
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