Looking for a bug

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by one_raven, Jul 25, 2008.

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  1. draqon Banned Banned

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    yea....its fun thou...join in...
     
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  3. Sciencelovah Registered Senior Member

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    This?

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  5. Enmos Staff Member

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    Snipefly (Rhagio sp.):

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    Tiger Beefly (Xenox tigrinus):

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  7. Enmos Staff Member

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    IF it is a fly.
     
  8. draqon Banned Banned

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    Enmos how do you like the big fly picture...hehehee
     
  9. Enmos Staff Member

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    What about it ? Never seen that before ?

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  10. Sciencelovah Registered Senior Member

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    Lol, I never know there are so many amazing flies. What about this:

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  11. Sciencelovah Registered Senior Member

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    Macheirocera grandis:

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  12. iceaura Valued Senior Member

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    Moths like that are heavy and hard - they aren't fluttery and butterfly like; they carom and bang on windows.

    There are many kinds of clearwing moths.

    And their wings often cover their backs when they sit, unlike most flies, and the small hindwings might not be obvious.

    But they don't land on things like wooden fences very often, that I know of. That is fly-like, solitary bee like, wasp like, or maybe ichneuman like, behavior.
     
  13. Diode-Man Awesome User Title Registered Senior Member

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    These photos are both interesting, and disturbing. So many variations!
     
  14. Diode-Man Awesome User Title Registered Senior Member

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    I know... this one isn't what you're looking for, but its very cool looking.

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  15. Enmos Staff Member

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    You image doesn't load, so I took the liberty to post another picture of it.
    It's a Glasswing butterfly (Greta oto).

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  16. Enmos Staff Member

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    One Raven.. you didn't slip did you ?

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  17. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    That is beautiful!

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    Thanks for posting it.
    I thought bugs only got that big when there is a lot of oxygen in the air. Where the heck is there that much oxygen in the air???
     
  18. Enmos Staff Member

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    No, you are confused with prehistoric times. Bugs got very big back then presumably because of higher atmospheric oxygen and higher temperature.
    Those insects dwarfed the moth in that picture.
     
  19. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    so bugs in higher oxygenated areas aren't larger than bugs in Tibet?
     
  20. Enmos Staff Member

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    Hum probably..
    You are turning it around though. At high altitudes the oxygen level is lower.
    I would think that the rainforests have a higher oxygen level than average.
    It might have some effect but it can't be much.

    Also, it's colder up high.
    Rainforests are also warm so in theory you should find the biggest insects there. There's also a lot of food around there.
     
  21. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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    sorry, I don't think my question came across right. I know Tibet has less oxygen. So aren't bugs in the jungle larger?
    Its a temp thing? Why? Heat gives them a longer life cycle so they have time to grow larger?
     
  22. Enmos Staff Member

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    It's temperature and oxygen levels.
    Why oxygen levels have an effect is obvious.
    It's because they don't have lungs but instead have a system of tubes and sacs, oxygen either diffuses into the system or is actively pumped around. The system is only efficient for smaller body sizes.
    Insects are cold-blooded so their metabolism needs a higher environmental temperature to function properly. Higher metabolism is more growth, simply put.
     
  23. Orleander OH JOY!!!! Valued Senior Member

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