Liquid Modernity

Discussion in 'Science & Society' started by Bowser, Feb 19, 2018.

  1. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    So I wonder where we may find ourselves in 20 years from now. With the passing of social and personal identity, will we become soulless robots? Or will a new identity arise to replace the old, a gypsy of sorts, one who traverses international and cultural boundaries.
    As I understand it, Liquid Modernity is a theory of the Globalized Economy and it's impact on culture and individualism.

    Wikipedia.org
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_modernity
     
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  3. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    The passing of social and personal identity is a problematic presupposition; perhaps your framework for that transition makes it seem more inevitable, but what you're trying to deal with, here, is a matter of macroeconomics as both driver and expression of sociopolitic.

    Think of how many times within the current macroeconomic framework people miss this or that transition; newspapers and the internet are a great example, but a lot of companies missed the realities of the internet. The individual mandate is another. Both struggle to work within traditional frameworks instead of establishing new ones; thus far, any illusion of new framework has been just that, an operating shell within the traditional framework.

    And within this framework lie pathways, rather quite accessible and possible, by which the passing of identity you describe becomes inevitable. There is some historical irony in that it was during my lifetime more communitarian notions—e.g., communism—identified with the specter of general identity erasure, yet it will be our statist, post-capitalist cult that actually brings such outcomes. Then again, given the amount of microerasure our society has demanded over the years, perhaps our fears of macroerasure engage a self-fulfilling neurotic prophecy.

    But that all depends on what one means by the passing of social and personal identity, and what you present reads like economic dislocation and reaction thereunto.
     
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  5. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    The frame of reference shifts as the economic situation moves to a broader economy. Where I once worked in production years back, I now find myself working in the service industry, simply because the former has been outsourced. Where working for a company was once a 20-30 year endeavor, it is now transient and contractual for short periods. I find it less secure but also offering more freedom to explore opportunities. It does have an affect on the mindset. If I were not connected to family, I would be moving about.

    I am a bit concerned for my children and their future. Will they have what I had: a home, a family, and a measure of security? With a rapidly shifting culture, where will they find community and their place?
     
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  7. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    One way of looking at it is to consider the last several decades worth of societal decisions undertaken ostensibly in the name of promoting such American-values outcomes as home, family, and financial security, and considering how many of them were just schemes to redistribute wealth upward.

    In the context that the subsequent generation won't have what you did, a large part of that is your doing.

    Look outside the United States. You know, I can reach back two decades and find an Australian bartender named Isaac having a dispute about freedom, necessity, opportunity, and security with an American government agent in Hong Kong—a scene in a video game—and the underlying pitch sounds familiar and relevant in your context. Isaac, in this scene, was denouncing pretenses of democracy, as owning property and spending money were the only true freedoms. Less secure but offering more freedom to explore opportunities is an apt description of what our society has been building while pretending to do something else. Offering more freedom to explore opportunities, in such a context, is nothing more than a sales pitch for oligarchic economic dislocation and deprivation.
     
  8. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    What seems to be evolving is the pursuit of happiness that doesn't necessarily require more money. How that new idealism will pan out is yet to be seen. I don't think socialism will be the outcome though. What I see is a divide between two classes of people: those who find comfort in their possessions, and those who find freedom in minimalism. How the social structure--family, friends and community--develop in the later will be something to see.
     
  9. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    I also believe people are looking for ways to work around the hegemony rather than just being another cog in the machinery.

    As far as principles of economics are concerned, I ask myself which of the two affords the individual more freedom to be an individual.
     
  10. Tiassa Let us not launch the boat ... Staff Member

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    Quite frankly, I see people pushing the axiom, "Question everything", to self-defeat. There is the Law of Thelema; there is the Wiccan Rede; one would have thought the former could figure out the latter, but when the Gardenerian formulation arose in the nineteenth century, the post-Qabalist and post-Christian would-be sorcerers already made the point that, yeah, some explicit marker would probably help.

    Or, rather, something goes here about Mary Hume's superceding perfection and Lacy Davenport asking after the drapes.
     
  11. Bowser Life is Fatal. Valued Senior Member

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    "Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law. Love is the law, love under will."

    Tiassa, be kind and offer links that highlight the terms being used. I want to follow your train of thought but don't have time to track every obscure reference you throw.

    In a nutshell, Tiassa, we are changing, as we always have. What comes of us in the future? I don't see the structures of capitalism falling, but do believe people will start evaluating what's important over what is superficial. We might go full circle and rediscover what we had lost. The new man might become the old man of yesterday.

    Tiassa...thanks for participating.
     

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