Is there a simple way to detect gravitational waves?

Discussion in 'Pseudoscience' started by jcc, Jun 10, 2015.

  1. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

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    11,009
    I will assume you mean the ions of the plasma - yes they are vibrating.
    No
    No
    The energy is emitted as photons.
     
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  3. jcc Registered Senior Member

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    hot gasses and ions not vibrating? are you kidding?

    are hot water atoms vibrating? are atoms in your body vibrating?

    this is science forum right? please be precise.
     
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  5. jcc Registered Senior Member

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    412
    when mass/atom is vibrating, does it produce gravitational waves?
     
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  7. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

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    11,009
    I think I see the issue here you do not understand English.

    WTF?
    Yes and yes.
     
  8. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

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    11,009
    No
     
  9. jcc Registered Senior Member

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    In general terms, gravitational waves are radiated by objects whose motion involves acceleration. wiki

    are you sure vibrating mass is not producing gravitational waves?

    how about vibrating charges? are they produce em waves?
     
  10. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,009
    It is safe to say that a vibrating atom or ion is not producing gravitational waves. It is also safe to say that a charge that is accelerated will produce a photon or em wave.
     
  11. brucep Valued Senior Member

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    4,098
    GR predicts gravitational radiation, waves, and there's no requirement that the object emitting gravitational radiation is accelerating. GR is a local theory of gravity, spacetime curvature, that we use to evaluate the natural paths, geodesics, of object falling in the local spacetime. Freefall paths. What gravitational waves do is propagate the gravitational tidal field. The g field. Gravitational waves deliver the components of the stress energy tensor which determine the local spacetime curvature, gravity. It's dynamic. Sometimes the difference between g at different points in the field is referred to as a tidal acceleration or a tidal force. Acceleration is better since they're no real forces in GR. Taylor and Hulse received the Nobel in physics for indirectly detecting the effects of gravitational radiation on two pulsars in orbit with each other.
    http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1975ApJ...195L..51H
    http://www.astro.cornell.edu/academics/courses/astro201/psr1913.htm Has pictures. The Nobel lectures of Taylor and Hulse are pretty good reading.
    What charge can be associated with gravitational radiation? Let's say a star collapses into a black hole and ends up with a extremal charge left over after the collapse. In the metric that charge is counted as mass. If the charge is maximum extremal, the most possible, then the charge would count the same as the leftover mass. IE instead of one solar mass it would be two solar mass, etc.. Same for angular momentum.
    BTW gravitational waves have only been indirectly detected. Maybe the space experiment will be able to confirm the GR prediction directly.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2015
  12. jcc Registered Senior Member

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    412
    do exited atoms produce gravitational waves? yes or no?

    what do you mean by safe to say? is that the way of science?

    are vibrating/accelerating charges producing em waves? same frequency?
     
  13. brucep Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,098
    Gravitational waves are gravitational phenomena not electromagnetic phenomena. Everything moving radiates gravitationally. Nobody around here is going to argue with you about basic stuff such as do moving charges radiate. Safe to say means that moving charges radiate electromagnetically as predicted by all electromagnetic theory and they radiate gravitationally predicted by GR. Regardless what analogy you've come across electromagnetic and gravitational waves are different phenomena.
     
  14. paddoboy Valued Senior Member

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    23,049
    Gravitational waves are very tiny and so far impossible to detect, although we do have indirect evidence of them. Gravitational waves are produced by asymmetric S/N explosions, collisions of large planetary sized bodies, or degrading orbital bodies such as Hulse-Taylor Pulsar which provides firm evidence of a binary system actually emitting gravitational waves.
    But to detect them from what you are suggesting is impossible, if they create any gravity waves at all...which appears to be no.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2015
  15. jcc Registered Senior Member

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    any m1 and m2 at r distance, there is gravitation force f=G x m1m2/r^2.

    if m1 vibrates in m12 direction at n times per second, it sends f x n gravitational force pauses per second to m2.

    where is that energy go? heat? light? nothing? isn't energy conserve?

    can hot/exited/vibrating atoms produce gravitational waves?

    is each of the hot atoms in/of the sun producing gravitational waves?

    seems without emitting photon or em wave, exited atoms able to transfer energy by produce gravitational waves?
     
  16. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    11,009
    For the 3rd time NO.
    No one will ever detect a gravitational wave from an atom.
    Sure.
    Yes.
    No, not in most cases.

    You really like to ask the same questions over and over don't you? Do you have memory issues?
     
  17. brucep Valued Senior Member

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    4,098
    as far as I'm concerned.
    *Plonk*
     
  18. AlexG Like nailing Jello to a tree Valued Senior Member

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    Jcc is simply and repeatedly trolling.
     
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  19. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

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    11,009
    There would be no pauses. If we are talking about an atom there would be no detectable variation in gravity.
    What energy? The vibrational energy of the atom? It will transfer the energy by conduction or radiation.
    No.
    No
    No, it doesn't.
     
  20. jcc Registered Senior Member

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    so wiki is wrong?

    In general terms, gravitational waves are radiated by objects whose motion involves acceleration. wiki

    do atoms in hot water vibrate? do atoms in your body vibrate?

    in this thread, when bell 1 is ringing, is it producing gravitational waves? seems James think so.

    thanks for all the answers. most answers i don't understand, the rest i don't agree. no way i am trolling.
     
  21. Daecon Kiwi fruit Valued Senior Member

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    Why, exactly, do you not agree?
     
  22. jcc Registered Senior Member

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    everything origin said in the last 2 comments.

    wonder if i am the only one not agree?
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2015
  23. Daecon Kiwi fruit Valued Senior Member

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    3,133
    Yes, you're the only one "not agree".

    Everyone else appears to know what they're talking about.
     
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