Is the Higgs particle a process?

Discussion in 'Pseudoscience' started by BdS, Dec 22, 2015.

  1. BdS Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    422
    Energy cant be created or destroyed. You cant say the Higgs is giving other particles mass without saying that other particles are giving the higgs its mass first. When the higgs converts its mass to other particles, depending on the mass involved during the reaction will determine the result of the decay and the particles which will be formed into elements / atoms. In fusion the lighter elements create heavier elements, if you consider this then there must be a process involved where the mass of the lighter elements fused to create heavier elements. The mass was converted with only the available mass and energy. There was no particle that was specific amount of eV. What confuses me about the Higgs particle they say they found it at an x amount of eV. There are many different reactions that always contain a different mass not a specific amount of mass that the Higgs particle implies is required, why is that? The real question is in a reaction do the two elements particles masses join into one big particle that decays into smaller particles, or do the elements use the original particles and just reconfigure them into a new element/s? Either way I dont understand how a "Higgs" particle with a specific amount of eV is required.

    I think the Higgs particle or what the Higgs is implying is more of a process than particle with a set amount of mass? it could be a different type of particle, with any mass that's properties allow it to decay and the decay process must also allow to create particles into systems "atoms". Which implies the decay must give the particles controlled orbital momentum.
     
    danshawen likes this.
  2. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  3. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,579
    Is the Higgs particle a process?
    No.
     
  4. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  5. Edont Knoff Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    547
    The Higgs particle is a boson:

    Examples of bosons include fundamental particles such as photons, gluons, and W and Z bosons (the four force-carrying gauge bosons of the Standard Model), the recently discovered Higgs boson, and the still-theoretical graviton of quantum gravity


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boson

    Many of the bosons can cause force effects and are affected by these effects. E.g. the photon has some energy. Energy is equvalent to mass and causes gravity. So a photon affects other particles by it's gravity. Still it also is affected by other particles gravity as well.

    It still is a particle and no process.

    Similar applies to the higgs boson.
     
  6. Google AdSense Guest Advertisement



    to hide all adverts.
  7. BdS Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    422
    Can you tell me where or when I will find one of the higgs particles in anything?

    The whole initial concept of the higgs particle is logically flawed.
     
  8. BdS Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    422
    a particle that must be created through a process or how else?
     
  9. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,579
    Physics is not based on what you can or cannot understand.
     
    BdS likes this.
  10. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,579
    A drinking glass is produced by a process. The drinking glass is not a process.
     
  11. BdS Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    422
    I was worried you were going to show me where to find it, Not!

    The glass is the product of a process just like everything else in this universe, except the higgs?
     
  12. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,579
    Ah ha, so this is a reading comprehension issue!
     
  13. BdS Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    422
    Yeah it is, so where can I find one?
     
  14. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,579
    The LHC.
     
  15. BdS Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    422
    Its energy is in the process of being a drinking glass. Its never really "a" drinking glass since it energy is constantly in motion so there is never a moment when its anything, it constantly evolving. If I smash it, it will go into shards through another process and will be in the process of being shards. Just like there is a Higgs mechanism to allow the particle to evolve through a process.

    Ok, happy smashing then, bye. I'll keep thinking about where it could fit in in nature.

    The title the best you can do?
     
  16. BdS Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    422
    Its a higgs particle at 650 then it starts to decay and losses 80 then its now at 570, is it still a Higgs particle? Then it decays more by another 60 and is now at 510, is it still a Higgs particle?
     
  17. rpenner Fully Wired Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    4,833
    That has no connection with anything in this thread or the physics literature.

    The Higgs boson is an excitation of the Higgs field whose non-zero expectation value is the mechanism for the masses of electrons and weak bosons as predicted by Standard Model of particle physics. As the Higgs field is a single thing, its excitations that carry energy and momentum have characteristic intrinsic angular momentum (0), mass ( ~ 125 GeV if current results hold true), electric charge (0), etc.

    There could be other Higgs-like bosons if the Standard Model is not the final story of particle physics, but they would have their own distinct characteristics and quantum fields. But no theory predicts a sequence of events such as you describe. For one, you have not described a decay that obeys conservation of mass-energy and angular momentum and charge.
     
    danshawen and BdS like this.
  18. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

    Messages:
    31,639
    BdS:

    I think you might be confused about how particles get their masses. It has nothing to do with the Higgs boson. The Higgs boson is just an excitation in the Higgs field. The Higgs field itself is found everywhere. Particles with mass interact with the Higgs field as they move through space, in such a way that they act like they have inertial mass. It might be more accurate to say that what we call "mass" is actually just a name given to the observed interactions of some particles with the Higgs field.

    The Higgs boson is an unstable particle that can decay into various other particles, and those particles are what is detected by the Large Hadron Collider. The existence of the Higgs boson is inferred from the decay data.

    The Higgs boson always decays into other particles such that the total energy released in the decay processes is equal to the unique mass of the Higgs boson.
     
    BdS likes this.
  19. BdS Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    422
    I was just trying to give an example of the process I envisioned.
    For example I will assume in the reaction the elements particles merge to form 1 big particle that decays into smaller momentum controlled particles to a single element.

    I'll use two solar systems combining to help visualize the process.
    The stars are the protons the planets neutrons and the Solar Systems the nuclei. SS1 and SS2 are forced to merge and the collision forced all the mass into a single star with spin and a high temperature where fusion is still active. The new molten star starts to evolve and forces the denser elements to its surface (the opposite of non-molten planets). Violent eruptions start taking place on the surface of the new star and it starts to eject mass, if the ejected mass has the right momentum it starts to orbit the new star and blobs into a round planet from it own gravity while its still molten. Not forgetting that the mass on the surface of the star already had momentum from the spinning star, the eruptions gave the ejected mass extra outward and maybe extra left or right momentum. (Makes one wonder if that's why all the planets are orbiting in the same direction from the initial momentum from the stars surface.) The ejected mass (new planet/particle) is very close to the star still and starts being pushed away by the photons being emitted by the star, the closer the planet is to the star the greater the effect since EM dilutes over ISL. The star is also ejecting and evaporating gases and dust into the solar system that the new planet meets in space and acquires by its own gravity, constantly adding to its mass. The star is spinning and its magnetic field is spinning with it and maybe it interacts with the new planets field transferring orbital momentum / spin to the new planet. The decay process continues and more neutrons/planets are created.
    That's my cranky version.

    When the solar systems collide they could also create a mass dust environment that would follow mainstream solar system formation process.

    I think that would obey conservation and angular momentum for a single element, e- umm...
     
  20. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,579
    For crying out loud, how could a single particle possibly decay into an element.
     
  21. BdS Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    422
    Hahaha, I cant get a element from a particle, but you can get a universe from a point?
    Please cry quietly if you got nothing interesting to say...
     
  22. origin In a democracy you deserve the leaders you elect. Valued Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,579
    Do you think your ignorant fantasies are interesting?

    This is pointless.
     
  23. BdS Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    422
    What fantasies? Its there in plain English for you to rebut. Not enough hockus pokus in there for you to hide behind? show me the ignorance, it should be easy with your skill set.
     

Share This Page