International Space Station info

Discussion in 'General Science & Technology' started by river, Jan 19, 2013.

  1. river

    Messages:
    9,791
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/index.html

    I'll age myself and say neat stuff !!!!

    So cool

    Dig around , I'm watching the space station live !!!

    Later

    You know sometimes its nice to just sit back and relax , with no controversies , no opinions etc. Just enjoy

    This is what I found on this site

    Enjoy
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013
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  3. krash661 [MK6] transitioning scifi to reality Valued Senior Member

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    Spot The Station

    http://spotthestation.nasa.gov/

    this nasa link i posted is an alert sent to your email.

    it will alert you when ssi is in your area so you can view it through your telescope.

    example from this moring:


    noreply@nasa.gov

    Time: Fri Mar 15 5:46 AM, Visible: 3 min, Max Height: 84 degrees, Appears: SW, Disappears: NE
     
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  5. krash661 [MK6] transitioning scifi to reality Valued Senior Member

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  7. Billy T Use Sugar Cane Alcohol car Fuel Valued Senior Member

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    There will be a delay in the re-supply, as many on East Coast were watching the ship explode less than half hour ago: See it here:
    http://news.yahoo.com/commercial-supply-rocket-explodes-liftoff-224100998.html
     
  8. krash661 [MK6] transitioning scifi to reality Valued Senior Member

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  9. youreyes amorphous ocean Valued Senior Member

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    regarding ISS spotting, say I had astrophotography covered and was to focus on ISS with my Nikon DS90, what setting do I use? High ISO? Low Exposure?
     
  10. billvon Valued Senior Member

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    12,794
    Your biggest problem will be motion. The ISS is fast. Thus you'll need something like an altazimuth mount to sync the camera's motion to that of the ISS. Once you get that then a fairly long exposure with a low ISO will give you the best picture. DoF will not be much of an issue so your aperture can be as wide as the lens will handle.

    If you do not have access to a tracking mount, then the longest lens, highest ISO and shortest exposure possible is going to be needed. And even then I suspect you'll have trouble with motion; your best bet would be a good tripod aimed ahead of the station, then take pictures when it enters the frame.
     
  11. el es Registered Senior Member

    Messages:
    272
    Some years ago watching the shuttle chasing the ISS was an awesome sight. There was about a 10 degree separation between them.
     

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