If you add two tea bags into a tea cup, will more tea dissolve into the water?

Discussion in 'Chemistry' started by InquilineKea, May 25, 2008.

  1. whitewolf asleep under the juniper bush Registered Senior Member

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    Did I mean 100C?
     
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  3. Oli Heute der Enteteich... Registered Senior Member

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  5. whitewolf asleep under the juniper bush Registered Senior Member

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    Thanks!
     
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  7. Varda The Bug Lady Valued Senior Member

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    dont use tea bags, they taste like dust
     
  8. syncpan77 Registered Member

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    My guess is that indeed it is more a question of time than quantity limit. Try placing different flavored tea bags in one cup and you can still taste the different flavors, even if the bags are added at distinct times.
     
  9. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    On behalf of the moderator staff: Congratulations on winning today's Thread Necromancy contest!!

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    The last post on this thread was four years ago. Many of the participants aren't even around anymore.

    To add to my original post something that I didn't know four years ago: Caffeine is one of the most volatile organic chemicals. Virtually all of the caffeine in the tea leaches out into the hot water (it doesn't even have to be quite boiling) within the first sixty seconds. So the second time you use a tea bag you're getting essentially zero caffeine.

    This is, in fact, how they produce decaffeinated tea. Put it in hot water for a minute (I'm sure industrial processes have a much more precise figure than that, as well as a much more precise figure for the temperature) and then chill it back down quickly. I once tried to buy decaf tea in a "gourmet" tea shop and the lady acted as though I had asked for Lipton. But with a conspiratorial expression she drew me closer and explained very quietly that I can produce my own decaf tea by simply making it the regular way, pouring out the hot water after one minute, and then refilling the cup with fresh boiling water. I confess, I haven't tried it yet.

    Even the decaffeination process for coffee beans works in a similar manner.
     
  10. arauca Banned Banned

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    Did anybody mentioned that dissolved chemical in the tea are function of solubility of the chemical in the mixture of the tea and function of temperature.

    I am not sure if the tea will be solubilized completely because are bark of the plant which is not soluble , but some compounds will be leached out.
     
  11. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    We did that experiment in Organic Chemistry - boiled a tea bag for a couple of minutes (the altitude was almost 2000 feet, so the boiling point was significantly less than 100 degrees C) and extracted the caffeine from the water.

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    If I was adding to your earlier post, I'd mention that each of the chemicals in the tea will reach its own equilibrium at its own rate. The caffeine will reach equilibrium before the tea is ready to drink but many of the other constituents may not. You might get more good flavours by steeping it longer but you want to stop before the bad flavours start taking over.
     
  12. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    Tea made with much lower than boiling point water tastes atrocious.
    Did your mountain tea taste good? I would guess not.

    Two teabags in a cup tastes bad. The cold teabags bring down the temperature of the water too quickly.

    Tea made at the bottom of the ocean probably tastes great
    but I can't say for definite, not having made any tea there.

    I can say however, that tea made at the seaside is definitely superior to tea made in my home town at 237 feet
    and oddly enough ice creams taste better there too.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2012
  13. sideshowbob Sorry, wrong number. Valued Senior Member

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    :bugeye:
    It was actually prairie tea and we didn't drink it. We were only after the caffeine. There's a surprisingly large amount of it in one tea bag. :bugeye:
     
  14. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    I think I made that point four years ago when this thread was started.

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    Mountaineers always complain about the crappy coffee and tea they can brew at high altitudes. I suppose they have to settle for instant powder. Or maybe nowadays they have little pressurized kettles for the Sherpas to carry.

    I grew up in a city at 2600ft/800m. (Well I never actually grew up but I lived there during the years during which most people grow up.

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    ) Most of the people who lived there had migrated from other parts of the country, but I never heard anyone complain that the tea didn't taste as good as back home.

    You'll get a larger pressure gradient from changes in the weather than you will from a 70m difference in elevation. One centimeter on the barometer is about a one percent change.

    I think you're just discovering that everything tastes better when you're in a place you like better.

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  15. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    Mmmh....
    I haven't noticed any difference between tea in stormy weather, and tea in fine weather.
    Fine weather tea should taste better, and stormy weather tea worse.
    What we need is a good storm to test the theory.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2012
  16. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    Anyone here from the Gulf of Mexico with a teapot?
     
  17. arauca Banned Banned

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    I am late on these tea party . Any on is familiar with a caffeine free, called "sleepy tea " What are the components to induce sleep . I am using this product for over 3 months.
     
  18. Oystein Registered Senior Member

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    I have this huge teacup, wherein I use three tea bags at a time, just to speed up the tea making. I don't have much patience.
     
  19. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    What volume of tea does your teacup hold?
    A larger than normal tea-cup is usually called a mug.

    Have you ever met anyone who uses a bigger teacup than yourself?

    Personally, I would not want a larger teacup.
    For health reasons.
    Going to make tea is one of my major exercises.
     
  20. Fraggle Rocker Staff Member

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    Several of the tea companies market products of that nature. They usually list the species of herbs whose flowers, leaves and other components are used. In fact, in the USA they are required to do so.

    Many herbs have traditionally been used as sedatives. Chamomile, Matricaria recutita, is probably the most well-known in the USA today, and chamomile tea is very popular. It contains chrysin, which has been shown to reduce anxiety in rodents in laboratory tests. Chamomile also has anti-inflammatory properties as well as other documented medicinal uses. However, it can also cause miscarriage, and should not be used by pregnant women.

    I would assume, then, that it was used as an abortifacient in earlier times.
     
  21. Captain Kremmen All aboard, me Hearties! Valued Senior Member

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    To make good tea, the water should be poured into the cup while still bubbling from boiling.
    Hence the old tea-making saying "Take the pot to the kettle, not the kettle to the pot".
    Now the cup with the teabag has replaced the pot, but the same applies.
     

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