identify this style

Discussion in 'Architecture & Engineering' started by RubiksMaster, Sep 13, 2009.

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  1. RubiksMaster Real eyes realize real lies Registered Senior Member

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    I always see buildings that look similar to this one. It seems like these buildings were all produced around the same time period (maybe the 50s?).

    It seems to be characterized by a very grid-like pattern, and vertically alternating windows and metal.

    I'm trying to find out if there is a name for this style, but am having no luck with it. Anyone know? Here is a pic. I can come up with other pictures if needed.

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  3. draqon Banned Banned

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    I am thinking 60's
     
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  5. Enmos Valued Senior Member

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    Looks more like a seventies building to me.
     
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  7. Dywyddyr Penguinaciously duckalicious. Valued Senior Member

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    Looks like vague mix of Bauhaus/ International School.
     
  8. Enmos Valued Senior Member

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    It's seems like a cheap building to build.
     
  9. ScaryMonster I’m the whispered word. Valued Senior Member

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    International style was a branch of Modernist architecture that emerged in the 1920s and 30s.
    The focus was on the more symbolic attributes of Modernism.
    Walter Gropius also used the term in “Internationale Architektur” so there’s the Bauhaus connection..
    This style is commonly subject to disparagement as ugly, inhuman, sterile, and elitist, but at least it was original when it was first formulated unlike some of the Post Modernist stuff they’re putting up today.
     
  10. RubiksMaster Real eyes realize real lies Registered Senior Member

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    Here is another example I found. The style seems to be characterized by aluminum and stone.

    Note: none of these are my photos.

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  11. RubiksMaster Real eyes realize real lies Registered Senior Member

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    Good news everybody!

    I think I've finally found the answer. It's called mid-century modern. There are more "exotic" examples of it. Some of them are neat buildings, such as the Trans-america tower in San Francisco. Others are really ugly, like the ones I posted.

    The style was popular in the late 50s, and early 60s, hence the name. I'm not able to confirm at the moment, but I suspect the reason it was popular for offices and schools of the time period is because it was cheap to build.

    Well at least now when I drive by one of these, I don't have to say "gross, it's that 50s architecture I hate so much". I can say, "yuck, a Mid-century Modern office building!"
     
  12. draqon Banned Banned

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    weird Rubiks...but I actually adore this kind of architecture...simplicity always catches my eye.
     
  13. ScaryMonster I’m the whispered word. Valued Senior Member

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    University City of Caracas,the Clock and a mural by Armando Barrios located at the Plaza del Rectorado.

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    I think the building might look good as a drawing, but would actually be depressing to be in or around.
    Is this approach just decorative like wrapping up underpants with Christmas paper?
    The clock is more like a piece of cooperate art then actually a design element of the building.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2009
  14. CheskiChips Banned Banned

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    I think that last one is Bill Clintonian.
     
  15. mugaliens Registered Member

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    :roflmao:

    That's precisely what I was thinking. I lived in northern Florida in the sixties and seventies, so every time I see a building like that, it harkens back to the new buildings of my childhood.
     
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