I need someone who knows the math

Discussion in 'Physics & Math' started by BigBangIsGod, Mar 4, 2016.

  1. rpenner Fully Wired Valued Senior Member

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    4,833
    I don't think that anyone thinks that you get credit for that point, as I pointed it out in post #173:

    Physics looks simple when you isolate the system you are describing. Here there is an exterior source of momentum transfer which in post #173 I compared to an elastic collision with a hypothetical unmodeled infinite mass. Fields of constant acceleration don't happen in reality, with the canonical physics example being an approximation to terrestrial physics when the dimensions of the experiment are much smaller than the radius of the Earth. In such examples, one neglects momentum non-conservation in the vertical direction because one is not interested in modeling the change in momentum of the Earth, not because there is a flaw in the model in modeling the part one cares about.
     
    danshawen likes this.
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  3. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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    Agreed.
     
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  5. QuarkHead Remedial Math Student Valued Senior Member

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    I agree. Ignorant or confused posters usually provoke interesting discussions. Stubborn ignorami with personal agendas seldom do.
     
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  7. danshawen Valued Senior Member

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    I have no personal agenda. I like physics, and I also like math. Both have their uses, and if I have learned anything here, it is that it is difficult to impossible to do one without the other.

    I don't dislike anyone for not liking me or some of my ideas (and I'm sure this confuses them when they receive 'likes'), and also I try not to rave on about it when I don't like other people's ideas on the same subject. I seldom report anyone to moderators for abuse of the website unless they are selling something they shouldn't. Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

    It pleases me that as antisocial as I am, I don't hold a candle to some folks here who are rabidly intolerant of the same ideas I'm sure they missed or miscalculated on a test at some point, and who evidently think they have all of science and the math that goes with it all worked out, or at least worked out as far as they care to take it. And I'm sure they never, ever make a mistake, either.

    Astounding. Let he who already knew all about physics and math from the moment of birth cast the first stone.

    I can't wait to catch up when Facebook's 'dislike' buttons filter down to this and other similar websites. Being around the likes of paddoboy, brucep, and PhysBang tends to have a detrimental effect on all kinds of threads and negatively influence the people who participate in them. Just like it does or did on physicsstackexchange. Things seem to have calmed down considerably over there lately. I hope they found employment suited to their dispositions; perhaps apprentice campaign managers for Donald Trump

    Permanently ignoring the very few routinely and chronically abusive folks on this website was possibly the best thing I ever did. The effort to report them is frankly not worth the likely result.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2016
  8. pluto2 Valued Senior Member

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    1,012
    I've seen some very good physics books on Amazon but they are way too expensive for me.

    To be very good at physics requires talent and a lot of money to afford textbooks which obviously not everyone has.

    So my conclusion is: not everyone can be successful at physics because studying physics is way too difficult and expensive.
     
  9. rpenner Fully Wired Valued Senior Member

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    4,833
    That's why we have libraries for free access to expensive books. But to be good at any endeavor one needs practice and guidance as to when one is doing relatively better or worse.
     
  10. Confused2 Registered Senior Member

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    607
    The Kahn Academy ( https://www.khanacademy.org/ ) was set up for people without access to books or libraries. On the Internet I haven't encountered anyone of any consequence that would try to prevent me learning and many who give up their time to help. (Thanks rp, Brucep and many others).
    Edit ... it isn't easy because the subject (physics) really isn't 'easy'.
     
  11. James R Just this guy, you know? Staff Member

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    34,559
    danshawen:

    It is clear from the foregoing discussion that you really don't have much concept of what a reference frame is. You seem to think that objects have a kind of "home reference frame", and that they have a "time dilation experience" related in some way to their "home" frame. But a reference frame is not a place. It is a coordinate system used to label events. Objects exist in all reference frames at all times, not in just one at a time. You're better off thinking of a reference frame as like somebody's point of view, because that's essentially what it is. An apple exists in your reference frame and in mine and in the reference frames of all 7 billion of the rest of us, regardless of our individual states of motion. The amount by which the apple's time is dilated is different for those of us who don't share the same reference frame.

    Your ideas about "bound energy" seem sterile and unhelpful at this point. You offer no definition of "bound energy", and no explanation about the relevance (if any) of such a concept to relativity. If you actually have a coherent theory of this "bound energy" of yours, I suggest you post it in "Alternative Theories" and we can give it the once over.

    It is not appropriate that you continue to post bastardised versions of physics in the Science subforums. Please keep such posts to the Fringe areas in future.
     
  12. brucep Valued Senior Member

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    4,098
    ".....delusions of adequacy." LOL. Much less grandeur. I fear danshawen isn't in possession of a faculty much less faculties. I'm becoming 'less convinced' that this one has the mental faculties of an adult.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2016
  13. brucep Valued Senior Member

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    4,098
    I'm just glad you decided to post here. When I get a chance I want to check out the double slit experiment you linked. I've been hoping this site might consider asking rp to help moderate the science and math threads. He has the scholarship, and decorum, to moderate any thread started in this forum.
     

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